Track IV: Building Health Equity in Wisconsin Conference Agenda

Thursday, April 11, 2019

A healthy citizenry will increase economic capacity and drastically improve quality of life in Wisconsin. But how do we help all residents of Wisconsin attain their highest level of health?  The simplistic answer is to ensure accessible, affordable health care for all. However, we know that upstream social determinants play an enormous role in determining health outcomes. Health inequities are created when barriers prevent individuals and communities from reaching their full health potential. One way to measure progress is to examine health disparities, defined as “differences in health status between people related to social or demographic factors such as race, gender, income or geographic region.” This track will seek concrete solutions to overcoming health disparities that lead to health inequity.

Schedule

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Track IV: Building Health Equity in Wisconsin
Conference Agenda

Thursday, April 11, 2019

 

7:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

Exhibitor Set Up

7:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

Registration Open

8:00 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

Exhibit Area Open

8:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

Morning Activities

   

Land Acknowledgement

   

Welcome

   

Announcements

   

Opening Remarks

   

Introduction of Plenary Presenter

   

Plenary Speaker – Pardeep Singh Kaleka

   

Resident Artist – Dasha Hamilton

10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

10:30 a.m.

11:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions – Section One

 

 

Session 1-1: Pathways to Partnerships: Growing the Next Generation of Healers

 

Room: Executive Ballroom B

 

Description: Wisconsin Tribal Health Systems provide quality integrated care throughout the state and serve as valuable training centers for future healers.  Partnerships between tribal clinics and the Native American Center for Health Professions (NACHP) have been vital collaborations for creating greater awareness about tribal health systems, clinics, services and communities, as well as offering critical hands-on training for future healers.  Join this session to learn more about Wisconsin’s tribal health systems, partnerships, and best practices for collaboration and partnership building as a model approach to increasing healthcare pathways to practice.

 

Presenters:

·        Danielle Yancey, Director, Native American Center for Health Professions, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health

·        Melissa Metoxen, Academic and Community Support Coordinator, Native American Center for Health Professions, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health

·        Kymberly Ludwig, Doctor of Pharmacy Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy

Session 1-2: Health Equity Capacity Building: Building Powerful Coalitions and Alliances

 

Room: Executive Ballroom C

 

Description:  For over a decade the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute (HWLI) has built the capacity of community coalitions to advance health equity. HWLI is part of the University of Wisconsin, Population Health Institute’s Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group. MATCH works with public health and community partners to evolve practice, focus priorities, and shift power to support collective action on root causes of health and equity. This session will:  1. Describe a broad population health model 2. Identify strategies and approaches to improve health, and 3. Demonstrate surveillance tools. MATCH and HWLI’s approach to capacity building in Wisconsin will be described and lessons learned applying an equity lens to a statewide public health leadership institute. 


Presenters:

·        Paula Tran Inzeo, MPH, Program Director, MATCH, Population Health Institute University of Wisconsin

·        Sheri Johnson, PhD, Director, Population Health Institute University of Wisconsin

·        Lesley Wolf, Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute Program Director, Population Health Institute University of Wisconsin

·        Salma Abadin, Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute Community Teams Program Lead, Population Health Institute University of Wisconsin

Session 1 - 3:  Addressing Racism as a Health Issue

 

Room: Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: Our country is currently experiencing a great exacerbation of racial tensions. As healthcare providers, we are dealing with the effects of racism on a daily basis. In order to effectively address patients' needs, it is imperative that healthcare providers acknowledge the racial and socioeconomic challenges that patients face and recognize how these factors contribute to the physical and psychological conditions that patients experience. This presentation will outline the importance of addressing racism as a health issue and will highlight individual experiences and challenges in addressing it.

 

Presenters: 

·        Carmille Garrison, MD, Program Director, Assistant Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Family and Community Medicine,  Ascension Columbia St. Mary’s

·        Veneisha McKinney, MD, Director of Community Medicine & Maternity Care, Assistant Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Family and Community Medicine,  Ascension Columbia St. Mary’s

·        Bryan Johnston, MD, Resident Physician, Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Family and Community Medicine,  Ascension Columbia St. Mary’s Family

·        Ashley Munroe, MD, Primary Care Physician, New York

Session 1 - 4: Conscious/Unconscious Biases, Policies, and Practices that Limit Access, Treatment, and Health Outcomes of "Marginalized Populations"

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: A candid discussion of conscious/unconscious biases-policies-practices that limit access, treatment, and health outcomes of ‘marginalized populations’ that will also explore:

 

·        Need for interventions to address organizational structures that perpetuate inequities;

·        Consequences of healthcare providers who lack knowledge of the cultural values, experiences, and potential responses of marginalized populations;

·        Importance of diversity/inclusiveness among clinicians and associated service providers;

·        Stereotypes, embraced by many service providers that compromise equitable treatment, patient satisfaction, and health outcomes;

·        Increased lobbying of legislators and high-profile stakeholders to support these ideas;

·        Acknowledgment of the cultural/economic value of inclusive, equitable patient care.

Moderator: Linda Jackson-Cocroft, Publisher, Black Women 50+ Health & Lifestyles Magazine

Presenters:  

·        Bevelyn Johson,  LCSW, Founder AJA Enterprise, LLC / AJA Counseling Center 

·        Patricia Parker, CSW, UW-Milwaukee Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 

·        Julie B. Schuller, MD, MPH, MBA, FACP, President and CEO Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

Session1 - 5: Building Healthful Resiliency in High-Risk Youth

 

Room: Pier Marquette

 

Description: Youth exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and youth who may be perceived by others as “different” are at higher risk for adverse health outcomes. Take a journey with a junior high health teacher who developed the "My Choice" classroom program and “Ambassadors of Diversity” club at her school to build resiliency and encourage healthy peer and community relationships. Learn through hands-on activities and discussion. Practice different lessons that put the "8 Concepts to Building Resiliency" to work and see examples of successful advocacy projects students have done in the community.  Meet one of three medical students who are helping in the efforts.

Presenters:

·        Patricia Zemke, 6th Grade Health Teacher, NBCT, Wausau School District

·        Jimmy Mayer, Student, Medical College of  Wisconsin

 

11:30 a.m.

12:00  a.m.

Break – Exhibit Area Open

12:00 p.m.

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

12:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

Lunch Activities

   

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

   

Plenary Speaker – Thomas Frank

   

Resident Artist – Dasha Hamilton

1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

1:30 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions – Section Two

 

Session 2 - 6: Centering Voices of Lived Experience in Health Equity Work

 

Room: Executive Ballroom C

 

Description: Centering Voices of Lived Experience in Health Equity Work will highlight the FREE Campaign which is focused on the unique issues of women who have experienced incarceration, a critical health equity issue. We organize and empower women who have been affected to lead decarceration efforts, and use a public health lens to address the gender-specific impacts on social determinants of health. In this panel, leaders of the campaign (women directly affected by incarceration and their allies) will discuss the importance (and challenges) of building networks and movements for policy change led by affected individuals. Audience members will be invited to consider the relevance of this for their communities and their work.

 

Presenters:

·        Sarah Ferber, Associate Director, EX Prisoners Organizing (EXPO)

·        Catoya Roberts, Associate Director, WISDOM

·        Melissa Ludin, Organizer, EXPO

·        Victoria Faust, Action Researcher and Evaluator, UW Population Health Institute MATCH

Session 2 - 7a:  Toward Social Accountability: Exploring the Integration of Community Health Workers into Family Medicine Residency Clinics

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: For care to be socially accountable, it must be equitably accessible to everyone and responsive to patient, community, and population health needs. (Buchman, 2016). In striving to confront persistent local health disparities and embrace principles of social accountability, the University of Wisconsin Department of Family Medicine and Community Health are seeking opportunities to integrate community health workers (CHWs) into their residency clinics. While primarily wanting to improve clinical service to our most vulnerable patients, we also are seeking opportunities to expand education and research around inter-professional teams have greater capacity to promote community-centeredness.

 

Presenters:  

·        Jennifer Edgoose, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

·        Yanzi Jiang, Medical Student, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

·        Karina Atwell, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

 

Session 2 - 7b: Pathways to Workforce Development - Community Health Workers

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: Community Health Workers (CHWs) are frontline public health workers who are trusted members of and /or have an unusually close understanding of the community served. This trusting relationship enables CHWs to serve as a liaison/link/intermediary between health/social services and the community to facilitate access to services and improve the quality and cultural competence of service delivery. CHWs also build individual and community capacity by increasing health knowledge and self-sufficiency through a range of activities such as outreach, community education, informal counseling, social support and advocacy.

 

Presenters:

·        Bria Grant, Executive Director, Co-Founder, UniteMKE, Inc.

·        Keetah Smith, Director of Community Clinical Linkages, Co-Founder, UniteMKE, Inc.

·        Lakeeta Watts, CHW Network Coordinator, UniteMKE, Inc.

Session 2 - 8:  Empowering, Not Exploiting: Using Stories to Build Community Power

 

Room: Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: Storytelling is a powerful tool used to draw attention to a cause and put a face on society's grossest disparities. Often times, however, the people who share their stories aren't given the proper respect and the storytellers and their communities receive little direct benefit. There is a better way. In this session, we will share lessons learned from storytelling projects developed or co-developed by the community and how these projects can have a lasting impact long after the story is finished.

 

Presenters:  

·        Alan Talaga, COACH Program Lead, Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute

·        Selma Aly, Community Coach, Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute

Session 2 - 9. Building a Culture of Health for Hmong Americans in Wisconsin

 

Room: Executive Ballroom B

 

Description: Evidence has shown that health care utilization is influenced by cultural values, beliefs, and traditional health practices. The use of traditional folk medicine or a combination of Western treatment regimens and traditional medicine is common among immigrants. After fighting alongside the United States in the Vietnam War, many Hmong found refuge in Wisconsin. Wisconsin has the third-largest Hmong population in the country following California and Minnesota with over 49,240 Hmong. Attendees will gain an understanding of the cultural values, health beliefs, and traditional health practices of the Hmong to be able to build a healthier more equitable community.

 

Presenter: Dr. Kajua B. Lor, PharmD, BCACP, Chair/Associate Professor, Clinical Sciences Department,  Medical College of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy

 

2:30 -2:45 p.m.                      Break

 

2:45-3:45 p.m.                      Concurrent Sessions - Section Three

 

Session 3 - 10:  A Framework for Building a Resilient and Trauma-Informed Community

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom B

 

Description: Representatives from several sectors in La Crosse County have begun a collective impact effort to create a resilient and trauma-informed community by aligning the work of organizations, agencies, governments, schools, and businesses to a four-part framework.  Learn about the development and components of the framework, including its Four Commitments, and the layered trainings and orientations being employed to build a community-wide foundation of common language and knowledge about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), trauma-informed approaches, and resilience-building.  Although it still in its early stages, you’ll hear about how the effort has trained more than 1000 community members and several hundred healthcare employees and identified more than 50 individual “Champions” to drive the effort towards a resilient community.

Presenter: Catherine Kolkmeier, Executive Director, La Crosse Medical Health Science Consortium

Session 3 - 11a:   Understanding ALICE and Resources to Address Social Determinants of Health

 

Room: Executive Ballroom C

 

Description: A Study of Financial Hardship in Wisconsin to understand the challenges that communities face when nearly 38 percent of Wisconsin's households live below a basic survival budget. ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) introduces several new measures of financial hardship; provides data that will help organizations address health equity by gaining a better understanding of local conditions and environments and gives examples of how communities are creating strategies to better connect individuals and organizations to services within the social determinant service array.

 

Presenter: Charlene Mouille, Executive Director, United Way of Wisconsin

 

Session 3 - 11b: Reducing Wisconsin Poverty by Half: The Best Prescription for Improving Health Outcomes and Equity

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom C

 

Description: There is a growing body of empirical evidence that has clearly demonstrated that a "package" of work-based policy reforms can reduce poverty in Wisconsin by 50 percent or more. The evidence also indicates that this anti-poverty policy package is popular and can enhance health outcomes for low-income children and adults, thus promoting equity. Part of this session will outline the components of the policy package, summarize the evidence that adoption will dramatically reduce poverty and improve health outcomes and equity, and explore how institutional and ideological barriers can be overcome.

 

Presenter: David Riemer, Senior Fellow, Community Advocates Public Policy Institute

Session 3 - 12c:  Gun Violence: A Biopsychosocial Disease

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description:  Gun Violence: A Biopsychosocial Disease frames gun violence as a biopsychosocial disease. Framing gun violence as a biopsychosocial disease places it firmly within health care systems as well as within public health practice. It also permits prevention and control discussions at the systems, program, and policy levels. This approach provides an opportunity to address scientifically inaccurate assumptions about gun violence and helps ensure that policy decisions are made with the most comprehensive, precise, and scientific understanding.

 

Presenter: Stephen Hargarten, MD, MPH, Director, Comprehensive Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin

Session 3 - 12d: Suicide in Wisconsin: Disparities in Suicide Across the State

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom D
Description: Suicide in Wisconsin: Disparities in Suicide across the State will examine the burden of suicide in Wisconsin, focusing on disparities in suicide by age group, race, and sex. The session will also use case studies to focus on disparities by other group characteristics, including veterans, to deepen attendee understanding of the complexity of suicide.

Presenter: Sara Kohlbeck, MPH, Assistant Director, Comprehensive Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin

Session 3 - 13: Our Diversity is our Strength: Our Students are our Future

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: This workshop will highlight different strategies and action steps that a district in Central WI is implementing to ensure that students of all backgrounds are provided the same educational opportunities and rigor as their peers.  Attendees will participate in interactive simulations and activities that will allow them to experience and empathize with students of diverse backgrounds.  The outcomes of this workshop will be for attendees to: 1. Understand the struggles of our diverse student populations.  2. Determine what action steps a school district can implement to interrupt inequalities. 

 

Presenters:

·        Dr. Mary Jo Lechner, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Learning, D.C. Everest School District

·        Yaou Yang, District Hmong Liaison, D.C. Everest School District

 

3:45-4:00 p.m.                       Passing Time

 

4:00-5:00 p.m.                       Concurrent Sessions – Section Four

 

Session 4 - 14: What Works? Social and Economic Opportunities to Improve Health for All

 

Room: Pier Marquette

 

Description: How are you taking action to address the social determinants of health and increase equity in your community? How do you find policies and programs that can help you make a difference, and how do you know if they will work? In this session, you will be introduced to an online resource that will bring evidence to your fingertips-- What Works for Health-- and have an opportunity to explore strategies that can improve social and economic opportunities locally. You will leave with a better understanding of the nuances of strategy selection and a personalized action plan with strategies to explore further.

 

Presenters:

·        Alison Bergum, Associate Researcher and Team Director, What Works for Health, UW Population  Health Institute

·        Jessica Solcz, Evidence Analyst, What Works for Health, UW Population Health Institute

Session 4 - 15: Empowerment: Understanding and Accepting Gender Dysphoria

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom A 

 

Description:  Come and meet Andrew, a senior at Stevens Point Area Senior High.  He and his mom will share his journey as a transgender child and student in today's world.  Acceptance and inclusion at an early age has lead to some fascinating personal growth in this family.  While Andrew knew from as early as he can remember that he was very different from his peers, it wasn't until he was a freshman in high school that he learned about gender identity and gender dysphoria.  The medical perspective is equally important especially when pediatricians are accepting and supportive.  Dr. Meyer will share tips and techniques for families and office protocols that are patient friendly to the transgender child.

 

Presenters:

·        Andrew Borchardt, GSA (Gender and Sexuality Alliance) Co-president,  Student, Stevens Point Area Senior High

·        Kelly Borchardt, Parent and Executive Director, Childcaring, Inc.

·        James Meyer MD, Adolescent Pediatrician

Session 4 - 16: Climbing the Engagement Ladder: Strategies to Involve Diverse Voices

 

Room: Executive Ballroom B

 

Description: Researchers and practitioners dedicated to building health equity recognize the value of including patient/community voices in their processes. Even though patient engagement is desirable, there are potential barriers that discourage organizations from undertaking this work. Participants in this interactive workshop will: 1. learn about developing and sustaining advisory groups from diverse backgrounds; 2. identify how advisory groups can offer feedback at different stages in a project; 3. explore possibilities for applying this engagement process in their own work settings; and 4. gain access to two toolkits offering comprehensive strategies to bring underrepresented voices into research and delivery of human services.

 

Presenters:

·        Betty Kaiser, PhD, RN, Director of Stakeholder Training, Wisconsin Network for Research Support, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin – Madison

·        Gay Thomas, MA, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Wisconsin Network for Research Support, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin – Madison

·        Katrina Phelps, PhD, Community Liaison and Communications Specialist, Wisconsin Network for Research Support, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin – Madison

Session 4 - 17a:  Safe Shelter for Sisters: Housing Access for Women in Street-based Sex Work

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: This session will: 1. provide an overview of the unique challenges facing women in street-based prostitution, including effects on health status; 2. discuss how access to shelter and housing are critical to ensuring that women can safely exit; 3. articulate a partnership comprised of a community-based agency focused on harm reduction, a medical school, and a coordinated entry program for homeless services; and 4) discuss how the partners are working together to appropriately identify women in need of health care and safe shelter.

 

Presenter:  Staci Young, PhD, Associate Professor, Medical College of Wisconsin

 

Session 4 - 17b: Community Development Sector Investments to Build Healthy Communities

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: Community development is a multi-billion dollar sector of the American economy focused on the development and financing of housing, community centers, small businesses, health clinics, job training, and other health promoting community conditions.  Incorporating health equity into community development is a promising approach to sustainably address the social determinants of health and create vibrant communities of opportunity in Wisconsin.  This session will describe mechanisms to promote health equity-driven investing by Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs).  We will walk through a health-focused framework for the community development sector and review tools to incorporate health and equity into CDFI investment processes.

 

Presenters:

·        Victoria Faust, Action Researcher and Evaluator, Population Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison

·        Marjory Givens, Associate Scientist, Population Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Session 4 - 18: Youth in Action: Community Activated Medicine

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom C

 

Description: The aim of this workshop is to promote mental health equity for American Indian youth, their families, and communities. This is an interactive, trauma-Informed, and creative way to inspire youth to activate their role and engage in courageous and curious conversations around often challenging topics such as mental health, sexual assault, suicide, and overdose. Through fun and engaging ways, participants will learn how generational adversity, stress, historical trauma, and contemporary trauma can impact the individual, familial and community levels. Lastly, we will explore healing pathways for success through learning self-care practices, fostering legacy building, and community stewardship.

 

Presenters:

·        Lea S. Denny, MS, LPC, NCC, NMT, Founder & CEO of HIR Wellness Center,

·        Barbara Blackdeer-Mackenzie, HIR Wellness Center Board President  

·        Saya Rhoden, Jasmine Lucio, and Tatiana Martinez, Youth Mentors

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2019

 

7:30 a.m.

8:20 a.m.

Continental Breakfast- Exhibit Area Open

8:20 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

Morning Activities

   

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

   

Plenary Speaker – Dr. Edward Lee Vargas

   

Announcements

9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

9:30 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions – Section Five

 

 

Session 5 - 19: Community Connections Team: Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Rural Wisconsin

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom B

 

Description: Community Connections Team (CCT) is a volunteer-driven program developed by Marshfield Clinic Health System, Family Health Center of Marshfield, Inc., and the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. It was launched in 2015 to improve clinical care by connecting patients with community resources to address social needs. This presentation includes program impact assessment on clinical outcomes of patients impacted by CCT, impact on healthcare utilization patterns, and CCT efforts to integrate underrepresented individuals into programmatic decision making.

 

Presenters:

·        Trevor Begin, Project Manager, Marshfield Clinic Health System-Center for Community Health Advancement

·        Dr. Ruth Cronje, Professor of English, Watershed Institute, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

·        Dr. Eric Giordano, Director, Wisconsin Institute of Public Policy and Service

·        Cole Haschke, Undergraduate Research Collaborator, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

·        Eva Scheppa, Director of Health Services, Family Health Clinic of Marshfield, Inc.

Session 5 - 20: Marathon County Teen: A Documentary Video Series and Teen Panel Discussion 

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom C

 

Description: Marathon County Teen is a documentary video series about high school life in Marathon County today. It was filmed in seven school districts in 2017, both metro and rural, and includes interviews from about 20 students. The piece is youth-led, with no adult voices, opinions or intrusions. Marathon County Teen is divided into seven short chapters, each roughly 3-3.5 minutes - total running time of complete film is 25 minutes. This presentation will feature a viewing of the video series followed by a facilitated panel discussion of Marathon County teenagers.

 

Presenters:

·        Laura Hunt, Project Creator and Director, Healthy Marathon County

·        Kayley McColley, Youth Council Member and Advocate, Student, Northcentral Technical College

·        Ethan Laska, Youth Council Member and Advocate, Student, D.C. Everest Senior High

Session 5 - 21a: Tool Exploration: How effective is your partnership? 

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: Building healthy communities and advancing equity is challenging. Trust, common vision, communication, and a strong multi-sector partnership are critical for effective community change. Now there is a tool to help you understand how your partnership is doing in these areas and others. The Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation (AACT) was co-designed by County Health Rankings and Roadmaps, Georgia Health Policy Center, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement/100 Million Healthier Lives. It helps partners gain a shared understanding of their collaborative work and identify how to move forward together. Learn about and provide feedback on this new tool.

 

Presenters:

·        Kate Konkle, Team Director for Community Learning, County Health Rankings and Roadmaps

·        Karen Odegaard, Action Learning Coach, County Health Rankings and Roadmaps

 

Session 5 -- 21b:  A Walk in Their Shoes

 

Room: Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: As late as the 1980 U.S. Census, Marathon County was part of the “whitest” congressional district in the United States. In the late 1980’s and 1990’s, central Wisconsin began to see immigration of Southeast Asian refugees. Subsequently, Mexican immigrants arrived to work on dairy farms and in meat processing plants. Today, the Wausau School District boasts students who speak over 35 different home languages and some rural school districts now have 50 percent Hispanic students.

 

Learn about one teacher’s vision to bring authors with compelling stories of humanity and transformation to students and community members in Marathon County and how “A Walk in their Shoes”:

·        Better equips the children of central Wisconsin to live and thrive in a global society.

·        Empowers young people to make a difference in the world in which they live.

·        Provides context and relevance for classroom instruction of social and cultural studies.

 

Presenter: Colin Hanson, 5th Grade Teacher, Edgar Elementary School and visionary for A Walk in Their Shoes

Session 22c: Social Determinants of Health in Action: Ascension Wisconsin’s Family Care Center Creating Healthier Communities Outside the Hospital Walls

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: This session will help audiences understand how to implement solutions to social determinants such as how to reduce food insecurities, health and wellness, and access to primary care. Take away ideas include partnerships, opportunities for clinicians and community programmers to learn about how to implement social determinants of health, and ways to find primary care homes for uninsured, underinsured and vulnerable populations to reduce chronic diseases and create healthier communities.

 

Presenters:

·        Sandra Olsen, MS, Program Administrator, Ascension All Saints Family Medicine Health Center/Medical College of Wisconsin

·        Veneshia McKinney-Whitson, MD, Community Medicine Director and Assistant Professor, Ascension All Saints Family Medicine Residency/Medical College of Wisconsin

 

Session 5 - 22d: SMARTIE Objectives at SSM Health to Introduce and Build Equity and Inclusion

 Room: Executive Ballroom D

Description:  SSM Health started using SMARTIE (Strategic, Measurable, Ambitious, Realistic, Time-Bound, Inclusive, Equitable) goals and objectives as part of a mini-grant program, coalition strategic planning and performance management efforts as a means of introducing and building racial equity and inclusion concepts and efforts.  SMARTIE goals are consistent with SSM’s organizational values of respect, compassion, excellence, community, and stewardship and the SMARTIE approach is a clear, direct and easily understandable approach to infusing equity and inclusion into organizational norms and practices.  Because SSM Health is dedicated to advocating for a just sustainable health care system with special concern for the marginalized, SMARTIE goals fit the organizational culture and connect seamlessly with broader community benefit and community health efforts directed toward health equity and the social determinants of health. 

Presenters:

·        Megan Timm, NDTR, CLC, CTTS, Community Education Specialist, SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital – Janesville

·        David Pluymers, MSTHA, RS, Regional Director of Community Health, SSM Health

 

10:30-10:45 a.m.                  Passing Time

 

10:45-11:45 a.m.                  Concurrent Sessions – Section Six

 

Session 6 - 23a: Wisconsin Healthy Communities Designation Program: Advancing Health Equity Locally

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom B

 

Description:  Wisconsin Healthy Communities Designation is a new initiative designed to celebrate and encourage achievements in health improvement and to serve as a guide for communities to expand and enhance their efforts. The program recognizes communities that focus efforts across the multiple factors that influence health including health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment with a strong focus on health equity, multi-sector partnerships, and sustainable solutions.

 

Presenter: 

·        Ann McCall, Communications and Project Manager, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, UW Population Health Institute

·        Mallory Swenson, Graduate Student Project Assistant, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, UW Population Health Institute

  • Melissa Thomas, Public Health Nurse, City of West Allis Health Department 
  • Traci Wilson, Community Health Program Coordinator, Fort HealthCare, Inc., Jefferson County 

Session 6 - 23b: Improving Health Equity through Service and Training: The Wisconsin Population Health Service Fellowship

Room: Executive Ballroom B

Description: This session will highlight the Wisconsin Population Health Service Fellowship Program. This is a 2 year service and training program designed for master prepared individuals in public health and allied sciences. The program has designed its curriculum around health equity, collaborative leadership, service and mentorship. The presentation will focus on the curriculum design and implementation of the Fellowship program.

 

Presenters:

·        Sweta Shretha, Wisconsin Population Health Service Fellowship Program Manager, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

·        Paula Tran Inzeo, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group Director, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

Session 6 - 24: Investing in Young Children to Promote Inclusive Opportunity

 

Room: Executive Ballroom D

 

Description: Disparities in economic opportunity and health equity open early in a child’s life. During the first few months and years of life early experiences establish the building blocks for skill development and future health. While stable and nurturing relationships with caregivers and community support can help children develop and thrive, chronic exposure to adverse experiences can lead to a brain wired for negligence or threat, impairing learning, memory, or the ability to self-regulate. This session will explore how early childhood investments support inclusive growth by addressing factors that lead to disparities before gaps in achievement, health, and job skills.

 

Presenters:

·        Dipesh Navsaria, Faculty Pediatrician, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

·        Rob Grunewald, Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

·        Corina Norrbom, Health Policy Fellow, Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service

 

Session 6 - 25c: Innovative, Collaborative, and Community Based Approaches to Combating Wisconsin's Racial Inequities in Infant Mortality

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom C

 

Description:  In this dynamic and thought provoking presentation, Dr.  Jasmine Zapata and team will discuss innovative, collaborative, and community based approaches to combating racial inequities in birth outcomes. 

 

Presenter: Dr. Jasmine Zapata, Faculty Pediatrician, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

 

Session 6 - 25d. Community Partnerships can Reduce the Infant Mortality Rate in Milwaukee County’s most Vulnerable Patient Populations

 

Room:  Executive Ballroom C

 

Description:  This presentation will help audiences understand how to utilize community engagement and partnerships to reduce infant mortality among poor and vulnerable populations.

Presenter:  Julia Means, Parish Nurse, Ascension Wisconsin

Session 6 – 26: Making the Most of the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps to Advance Equity 

 

Room: Executive Ballroom A

 

Description: County Health Rankings and Roadmaps (CHR&R) has helped shape the conversation around the social determinants of health and our model for health has become a valued resource for people around the country working to transform their communities. We have recently expanded our resources to better support communities working on advancing equity. We will share: 1. How CHR&R data can be a starting point for analyzing and discussing disparities; 2. Guidance to support communities seeking to actively partner with people most affected by poor outcomes and injustice; and 3. Stories of how communities are working to close gaps and increase equity.

 

Presenter: Karen Odegaard, Community Coach, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

 

 

11:45 a.m.

12:15 p.m.

Break

12:15 p.m.

12:45 p.m.

Lunch

12:45 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

Afternoon Activities

   

Performance – Dasha Hamilton

   

Next Step Facilitated Discussion

   

Introduction of Closing Speaker

   

Closing Speaker-Dr. George Koonce

   

Send Off-Eric Giordano