Track III: Raising the Next Generation of Inclusive Leaders Conference Agenda

Thursday, April 11, 2019

If we hope to have a society that is inclusive, fully employed, maximally productive, and celebratory of diversity generally, we must allocate resources and energy towards the success of the next generation of leaders. Along with the challenges, there are opportunities. Effective after school programs, innovative career exploration and preparation, co-curricular apprenticeships and dual enrollment are just a few of the many positive initiatives that are helping lay the groundwork for success for all youth regardless of background.

Schedule

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Track III: Raising the Next Generation of Inclusive Leaders
Conference Agenda

Thursday, April 11, 2019

 

7:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

Exhibitor Set Up

7:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

Registration Open

8:00 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

Exhibit Area Open

8:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

Opening Speakers

   

Land Acknowledgement

   

Welcome

   

Announcements

   

Opening Remarks

   

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

   

Plenary Speaker – Pardeep  Singh Kaleka

   

Resident Artist – Dasha Hamilton

10:00 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

10:30 a.m.

11:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions -  Section One

 

Session 1 - 1: Education and Career Challenges for the Immigrant Youth

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B

 

Description: Countless students graduate at the top of their class but have no legal authorization to work in their field, or in any field.  Many are undocumented.  Others are legally present, but their visa does not allow them to work.  Others find a job willing to sponsor them, but by the time they graduate all work visas run out for the year.  Navigating the immigration maze is a job in and of itself, for parents, students and teachers alike. This session discusses the options and limitations our young immigrant graduates, both documented and undocumented, have to pursue legal work authorization.

 

Presenter: Raluca (Luca) Vais-Ottosen, Partner, Immigration Attorney, DeWitt LLP

Session 1 - 2: How America Pays for College

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Description: This session will share highlights from How America Pays for College 2018, a national study by Sallie Mae and Ipsos. Discussion will focus on the resources families use to pay for college, particularly reliance on financial aid, scholarships and the role of student loans, and highlight differences among certain population segments.  We will also explore how families regard the value of higher education, the factors that influence their school choice and the steps they are taking to make college affordable. The session will also cover activities the State Department of Financial Institutions is doing to help educate students and parents on how college is attainable and affordable.

                                               

Presenters:

·        Jill Gosse, Senior Account Executive, Sallie Mae

·        Cheryl Rapp, College Affordability Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions

Session 1 - 3 Interrupting Bias in Academic Settings

 

Room: Solomon Juneau

 

Description: This workshop is designed to give an overview of implicit bias, how implicit bias impacts diversity and inclusion, and why diversity is important. It will then provide participants with the opportunity to practice confronting bias. Research indicates that bystanders are more likely to say or do something to confront bias when they have had practice doing so, and most people do not have experience or training on confronting bias. This workshop will provide that practice.

 

Presenter: Jamie Huber Ward, Associate Director of Extension Services, National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT)

Session 1 - 4: Re-framing Equity in the Wisconsin Technical College System

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room A

 

Description:  The Wisconsin Technical College System has strategically aligned state and national initiatives to explore equity gaps within the system. The System Office in partnership with college leaders have leveraged data systems to increase understanding around our strengths and opportunities for growth and start honest conversations around student success for ALL students.  A panel of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion representatives from various colleges in the WTC System will discuss this collaborative effort and how having a community has supported their ongoing work at their own institutions.

 

Presenters:

·        Colleen Larsen, Education Director-Student Success, Wisconsin Technical College System

·        Brenda Powles, HR Manager, Wisconsin Technical College System

·        Mary Anna Thornton, Director Achieving the Dream, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Western Technical College

 

11:30 a.m.

12:00  a.m.

Break – Exhibit Area Open

12:00 p.m.

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

12:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

Lunch Speakers

   

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

   

Plenary Speaker – Thomas Frank

   

Resident Artist – Dasha Hamilton

1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

1:30 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions – Section Two

 

                

Session 2 - 5:  Emerging Research on Early Brain Development

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room A

 

Description:  Research on early brain development has accelerated in the past few years, using a variety of technologies, including LENA.  Among the key findings are that conversational turns are even more important than just the number of words. Researchers have pinpointed the precise areas of the brain affected by language and found that those areas are key to not only cognitive growth, but also to social and emotional health. Participants will learn about recent brain research and how Marathon County, WI, has put this research into action through their LENA Start program.

 

Presenters:

·        Traci Martin, Senior Manager, Customer Success, LENA

·        Madyson Main, Parent Educator, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

Session 2 - 6: Activities and Metaphors to Facilitate Deeper Discussions

 

Room:  Solomon Juneau

 

Description:  This workshop will walk participants through some simple and adaptable activities that can assist group facilitators, educators and others in encouraging deeper discussions around basic issues of community awareness and any related topic. We will also explore ways to adapt these activities for different ages, outcomes, and situations and look at ways to process experiences and transfer learning to real life. This is an active workshop. Come prepared to interact and experiment.

 

Presenter: Mark Zanoni, Leadership Program Outreach Director, Camp Manito-wish YMCA 

Session2 -  7: Resources to Enhance ACT College and Career Readiness

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B

 

Description: This session will focus on sharing tools and resources available for students, parents, and educators that allow for an increased chance for college and career readiness and success on the ACT test. Topics include Social and Emotional Learning research, Tips for Test Taking strategies, ACT Prep Resources (emphasis on ACT Academy), ACT Research Data on student success, and Q and A.

Presenter:  Dan Valentyn, Wisconsin State Lead, ACT

Session 2 -8:  Q and A with Dr. Edward Lee Vargas

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Presenter: Dr. Edward Lee Vargas, Executive VP for National and International Programs, AVID

Session 2 - 9:  Exclusivity is Status Quo – Inclusivity Transforms:  Changing Our World One Emotional Intelligence Point at a Time

 

Room: Pier Marquette

 

Description: One cannot give what one does not have.  For future leaders to reflect inclusivity and reverse trends in disparities, they need to have skill sets that optimize their innate gifts and maximize their talents for the benefit of upcoming youth and communities that they will serve.  As winners of the 2018 Golden Psi Award from the American Psychological Association, the panel will discuss the significance and efficacy of successful, tailored, dynamic Social-Emotional Learning programs for inclusivity and enhancing EQ.  The hallmark of this work speaks to one’s humanity, conscience and creativity and fosters the transformation of communities for ubiquitous inclusion.

 

Presenters:

·        Barbara A. Hastie, PhD, UW Senior Lecturer; Adjunct Professor, University of Florida; CEO and Co-Founder AHEAD 360o, University of Wisconsin; University of Florida; AHEAD 360o (Addressing Health, Economic & Academic Disparities 360o)

·        Wendy A. Bana, PhD, Director of Curriculum and Instruction; Co-Founder, AHEAD 360o, AHEAD 360o (Addressing Health, Economic & Academic Disparities 360o)

·        Corinne Manetto, PhD, President of the Board, AHEAD 360o

 

2:30 -2:45 p.m.                      Passing Time

 

2:45-3:45 p.m.                      Concurrent Sessions – Section Three

 

Session 3 - 10: Making Inclusion Work Accessible to All

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Description: Your organization has developed a strategic framework for equity and inclusion, but whose job is it? Learn how one community college campus is creating a multitude of access points for all to get involved, in a way that meets each individual's comfort level and interests. When everyone is invited to have ownership in the work, inclusive thinking becomes more deeply embedded in the overall culture and climate. Time will be provided for reflection on hidden opportunities that might exist within your own organization.

 

Presenters:

·        Kristine Kuhn, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist and Diversity Team, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College (NWTC)

·        Katie Trulley, Academic Advisor and Diversity Team, NWTC

Session 3 - 11. Creating a World-Ready Wisconsin Through Equity in Access to Language Learning

 

Room: Milwaukee Room A

 

Description: This session will focus on the Wisconsin Language Roadmap Report. This report outlines recommendations and action steps for Wisconsin to improve access to the benefits of this learning.  Come learn about this state-wide cross-sector initiative and plan how you can support the development of a World-Ready Wisconsin!  You can make a difference and a difference can be made.  All Wisconsin students deserve access to the language, intercultural and global learning required for full participation and leadership in our linguistically and culturally diverse communities and world.

 

Presenters:

·        Pamela Delfosse, World Language and International Education Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

Session 3 - 12:  Equity in Higher Ed Math Success through Integrated Academic Support

 

Room:  Solomon Juneau

 

Description:  A recent Penn State study pegged Wisconsin as 49th in the nation in educational equity. Major achievement gaps in higher ed math success between Wisconsin’s sub-populations are a crucial component of this abysmal statistic. Math skills and confidence are critical for employability and careers with higher lifetime earnings. The session will highlight Western Technical College and how it has improved gateway math course success rates for all, and increased math success equity, through assessment/placement system changes, curriculum revision, and an intentional mix of academic supports (co-requisite courses, increased tutoring, and integrated basic skills/college credit instruction). Learn the details and become equity changemakers in your own settings!

Presenters:

·        Mary Anna Thornton, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Services, Western Technical College

·        Mandy Church-Hoffman, Associate Dean, Learner Support and Transition, Western Technical College

Session 3-13: Higher Education's Role in Promoting Inclusivity

 

Room:  Milwaukee Ballroom B

 

Description: The three-presenter panel will focus on higher education institutional efforts to attract, retain, improve experiences for and successfully graduate students of color and other underrepresented student populations. It's this pipeline of diverse talent that will fuel the workplaces of today and tomorrow. Led and moderated by University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Chancellor Andrew J. Leavitt.

 

Presenters:

·        Dr. Andrew Leavitt, Chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

·        Patrick J. Sims, Deputy Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion, University of Wisconsin-Madison

·        Dr. Sylvia Carey-Butler, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Support of Inclusive Excellence, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

·        Lucia Nunez, Vice President for Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement, Madison Area Technical College

Session 3 - 14:  Juggling Apples and Other Circus Tricks

 

Room:  Pier Marquette

 

Description: Chippewa Valley Technical College is in the sixth year of its iPad Accessibility Program. Our iPads are used to support student accommodations with additional apps that promote time management, mindfulness, study skills, and more. This session will highlight the process we have used to deliver accessible textbooks to students. We will walk you through how and why we built our program, the tools we use, and the results we’ve seen.  Historically, text-to-speech software programs were expensive and tied the individual to a desktop, limiting access to learning and assessment materials.  This was a barrier in the hands-on learning environments of high schools, technical colleges, and the workforce. We determined that iPads were relatively inexpensive, and when used with apps that don't require wifi, are portable. When students are properly trained, they can apply their skills and technology with independence in their learning environment and future employment.

 

Presenters:

·        Erin Poeschel, Interpreter/DHH Services Specialist, Chippewa Valley Technical College

·        Rachel Swatloski, Disability Services Specialist, Chippewa Valley Technical College

·        Brooke Cairns, Student Services Specialist, Disability, Chippewa Valley Technical College

 

3:45-4:00 p.m.                       Passing Time

 

4:00-5:00 p.m.                       Concurrent Sessions – Section Four

 

Session 4 - 15:  Addressing Academic and Career Barriers Faced by Students from Disadvantaged Communities

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Description: This interactive session is designed to discuss strategies and approaches that can help improve career connection opportunities for students from disadvantaged communities both at the pre-college and college levels. During the session, many of the challenges faced by this group of students will be highlighted. Session participants will also have opportunities to share with others their own strategies and approaches in helping students overcome academic challenges and make effective career connections at various stages of their educational journey. Ultimately, participants will leave this session with practical and demonstrated tips that will help establish stronger career opportunities for students.

 

Presenter:  Garry Moise, Program Director, Upward  Bound Math and Science, Marian University

Session 4 - 16a:  High School Supermileage Vehicle

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B    

 

Description: Come and learn about two innovative programs in two different parts of the state that help youth build their leadership skills. High School Supermileage Vehicle will highlight a small, diverse school district in Central Wisconsin that started a program for students to design and build Supermileage Vehicles to compete with other schools throughout the Midwest.  Find out how Bowler High School students were able to achieve a record-setting 765 mpg with hard work, determination and a shoe-string budget.

 

Presenters:

·        Timothy Ploeger, Instructor, Bowler High School

·        Jared Rickert, Former Student of Bowler High School

·        Ira Rudesill, Student, Bowler High School

·        Keegan Pingle, Student, Bowler High School

 

Session 4 - 16b. The True Skool Description:

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B

 

Description: Learn how TRUE Skool offers skill based learning in performance and visual arts while developing relationships with local businesses to create paid project and internship opportunities for TRUE Skool youth and young adults in business sectors that are not traditionally accessible to local Milwaukee artists.

 

Presenters:

·        Shalina S. Ali, Co-Executive Director, TRUE Skool, Inc,

·        Fidel Verdin, Co-Executive Director, TRUE Skool, Inc.

Session 4 - 17: Non-traditional Occupations: Bridging the Workforce Gap by Taking the Road Less Traveled

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room A

 

Description: Wisconsin's Workforce has more openings than ever before. We need everyone's talents to make Wisconsin work. This session will provide an introduction to nontraditional occupations, recognizing bias and micro-messaging, and best practices from area technical colleges in the recruitment and retention of students into nontraditional career areas. Take away ideas for partnerships, opportunities for students/adults to learn about nontraditional areas, funding opportunities through partnerships, and ways to recruit more students/employees into nontraditional areas with the ultimate goal of bridging the workforce gap.

 

Presenters:

·        Renae Fischer, Academic Advisor-NTO Specialist, Moraine Park Technical College

·        Masaya Xiong, Career Advisor, Madison College

·        Nutan Amrute, NTO Coordinator, Milwaukee Area Technical College

·        Wa Yia Thao, Student Support Specialist, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College

Session 4 - 18: The UW-Madison Posse Program: A Model for Increasing Educational Excellence and Leadership Among Underrepresented

 

Room:  Solomon Juneau

 

Description: The University of Wisconsin-Madison Posse Program, now in its 17th year, has developed effective methods of increasing educational success for underrepresented college students. Through a combination of multiple practices including mentorship, robust programming and holistic support for students, all in a cohort-based model, the program has achieved high retention rates, graduation rates, and other measures of educational excellence. Practices and outcomes will be shared with attendees to spark ideas on how to help under represented and minority students thrive during their undergraduate career.

 

Presenters:

·        Patrick Sims, Deputy Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion, University of Wisconsin-Madison

·        Dr. Sherri Charleston, Assistant Vice Provost, Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement, University of Wisconsin-Madison

·        Emilie Hofacker, Interim Director, Posse Program, Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement, University of Wisconsin-Madison

·        Albert Muniz, Advisor, Posse Program, Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2019

 

7:30 a.m.

8:20 a.m.

Continental Breakfast – Exhibit Area

8:20 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

Morning Speakers

   

Introduction of Plenary Speaker

   

Plenary Speaker – Dr. Edward Lee Vargas

   

Announcements

9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

Passing Time – Exhibit Area Open

9:30 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions – Section Five

 

Session 5 - 19:  Empowerment: The Other Side of Female Leadership

 

Room: Milwaukee Room A

 

Description: In this session we will explore how we can collectively use our strength as female leaders to develop and empower the next generation of leaders and build strength in our organizations. This session will include a review of the concepts behind effective empowerment of women leaders, interspersed with short discussions and paper exercises designed to reflect on the application of these concepts in each participant’s own organization.

Presenter: Lisa Grill Dodson, MD, Campus Dean, Medical College of Wisconsin-Central Wisconsin

Session 5 - 20:  Elevating Early Childhood Educators: How to Celebrate and Professionalize your Workforce?

 

Room:  Manager’s Room

 

Description:  A child's first five years are the most critical for neurological development, making early childhood teachers essential to preparing children for school and life. However, the field suffers high turnover rates. While pay is a primary concern, opportunities for growth and recognition are important to building morale and increasing competencies to build a stronger workforce. By creating opportunities for teachers to achieve recognition, obtain professional development, and co-create goals, we can elevate the profession, build capacity, and increase quality. In turn, this delivers positive outcomes for children. In this session, we’ll discuss these methodologies and share examples from our work.

 

Presenter: Traci Martin, Senior Manager of Customer Success, LENA

Session 5 -21: Authentically Engaging Youth to be Inclusive Leaders and Activities: Because THEY are the Experts!

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Description: The PATCH (Providers and Teens Communicating for Health) Program is known for its innovative approach to positive youth and community development and has been working alongside youth since 2010. PATCH is intentional and authentic in how they engage youth as partners to improve adolescent health outcomes, while also aiming to provide the necessary support, encouragement, knowledge, resources, and skills to become healthy, connected, productive, and thriving adults.  Attendees will engage in fruitful dialogue about the opportunities and challenges of working with young people, as well as learn effective strategies to raise the next generation of inclusive leaders. 

 

Presenters:

·        Amy Olejniczak, MS MPH, Director, Providers and Teens Communicating for Health (PATCH)

·        Caroline Gasao, Intern

Session 5 - 22a: TechGYRLS-Running on STEAM

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B                                                        

 

Description: This session will engage participants in a discussion about STEAM education outside of the classroom, empowering young women, and out-of-the-box methods of teaching. The TechGYRLS program works to empower tomorrow’s women in the areas of science, technology, engineering, arts, and math. But the program goes beyond that.  In addition to discussing ways to revolutionize out-of-school STEAM programs, we will discuss ways in which such programming can help build unique relationships between community organizations.  The Reggio Emilia approach to learning, as well as significant research on the subject emphasizes the importance of community engagement in student success. By involving families, schools, community members and organizations, and local businesses, TechGYRLS provides an interconnected experience with a myriad of opportunities for participants. This session aims to unpack the factors that go into the success of this program, as well as its impact on the community, and how this can be utilized in other communities.

 

Presenter:  Tonie Bear, Youth Program Coordinator, YWCA of Greater Green Bay

 

Session 5 - 22b. Increasing Opportunities for Inclusion in Wisconsin's Workforce Through Youth Apprenticeship

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B

 

Description: The second part of this session will share ideas about working with students with disabilities or who are at risk of not graduating. Students may "test drive" a career with the Youth Apprenticeship program. Hear how high schools across Wisconsin are offering training in a variety of occupations with support for students from the local high school, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Wisconsin Youth Apprenticeship program, employers and student mentors.

 

Presenter:  Amy Phillips, WI Youth Apprenticeship Program Coordinator, Department of Workforce Development/Department of Employment Training, Apprenticeship Standards Bureau

 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Passing Time

 

10:45-11:45 a.m. Concurrent Sessions – Section Six

 

Session 6 - 23:  ACT WorkKeys NCRC (National Career Readiness Certificate) and Wisconsin’s First Work Ready Community (Eau Claire County)

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room B

 

Description:  Educators have a crucial role in local workforce ecosystems to boost economic outcomes for communities. Discover how schools improve compliance and performance with industry-driven foundational skill certifications including ACT WorkKeys NCRC. All Wisconsin students have the opportunity to gain this credential.  Gain deeper understanding of local and regional partnerships that fully integrate education resources and strategies.  When secondary and post-secondary schools align with employers and economic development, they expand opportunities and provide poverty-ending career pathways for entry/middle-skill workers. Learn how Eau Claire County is becoming Wisconsin's first Work Ready Community by leveraging State resources and speaking a common language.

 

Presenters:

·        Dan Valentyn, Wisconsin State Lead, ACT

·        Lynette Livingston, Executive Dean, Chippewa Valley Technical College

Session 6 - 24: Building a Culture of Inclusivity into your Organization

 

Room:  Milwaukee Room A

 

Description: For organizations to be more inclusive, it has to start with their culture making sure that inclusivity is embedded in the organization's operation, beliefs, and a practiced expectation of leaders. The latest research on inclusivity in the workplace and benefits will be shared along with strategies to embed a culture of inclusivity.  How leaders are the catalyst to creating this culture and how they can do it in a way that it becomes a standard of operation.  A model to create this culture change will be shared. 

 

Presenter: Yengyee Lor, Leadership and Team Coach and OD Consultant, Faithful Consulting

Session 6 - 25a:  Tetwatunhatenyehse "We are Changing Our Lives" Oneida Rites of Passage

 

Room:  Manager’s Room

 

Description:  Participants will learn about the Oneida community. The Rites of Passage (RoP) group known as Tetwatunhatenyehse, ‘We Are Changing Our Lives’ is hoping to have a positive impact on the choices our youth make. The goal is to prepare our young Oneida men and women emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually for the next phase in their lives. Our vision is to help these youth create confidence in themselves, help them find their place in this world, and create stronger connections with their families, elders, mentors, and community using their traditional ways as the core of the teachings.

 

Presenters:

·        Margaret Ellis, Lead Auntie, Tetwatunhatenyehse

·        Latsiklanunha Hill, Indigenous Healing Practioner, Oneida Cultural Heritage

·        Ernest Stevens IV, 3rd year Nephew/Youth Ambassador, Tetwatunhatenyehse

·        Grace Webster, 3rd year Niece, Tetwatunhatenyehse

 

Session 6 - 25b. Rewiring the Brain and Collectively Cultivating a New World of Future Inclusive Leaders

 

Room:  Manager’s Room

 

Description: Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) are critical not only to develop inclusive leaders but to transform a society that celebrates diversity and maximizes the connection between knowledge and action. There is strong association between these skills and successful individual trajectories and more humane, inclusive communities.  Such programs create an environment where natural talents are carefully cultivated, lives are empowered, and potentials are realized.  This workshop will be experiential in nature to engage the audience in SEL principles and mindfulness practices that have been integrated for successful learning and development programs.

 

Presenters:

·        Barbara A. Hastie, PhD, UW Senior Lecturer; Adjunct Professor, University of Florida; CEO and Co-Founder AHEAD 360o, University of Wisconsin; University of Florida; AHEAD 360o (Addressing Health, Economic & Academic Disparities 360o)

·        Wendy A. Bana, PhD, Director of Curriculum and Instruction; Co-Founder, AHEAD 360o, AHEAD 360o (Addressing Health, Economic & Academic Disparities 360o)

·        Corinne Manetto, PhD, President of the Board, AHEAD 360o

 

Session 6 - 26:  Transforming Campus Culture: Ouch! That Stereotype Hurts

 

Room:  Crystal Room

 

Description: Facilitating authentic, constructive dialogue is a critical core competency in creating inclusive, socially just campus communities. Over the course of two years, Gateway Technical College has started the conversation and began building an inclusive campus culture model with the use of Ouch! That Stereotype Hurts: Communicating Respectfully in a Diverse World curriculum. Learn how Gateway has begun to transform campus culture and develop a common language to achieve inclusive excellence.


Presenters:

·        Jomarie Coloriano, Multicultural Support Specialist, Gateway Technical College

·        Dr. Tammi Summers, Dean of Learning Success, Gateway Technical College

·        Mary Xiong, Multicultural Support Specialist, Gateway Technical College

Session 6 - 27: Raising the Bar to Inclusivity: Discovering Diversity within First Generation College Students

 

Room:  Solomon Juneau

 

Description: First-generation college students, the first in their families to attend college, encounter challenges to their academic success including lower retention and persistence rates than continuing-generation college students, students who have parents that have completed a four-year college degree. Often, individual challenges to success instead of structural barriers, such as racism and classism, are highlighted for first-generation college students. Learn about the strengths first-generation college students bring to college and the challenges they traverse. In this interactive session, ways to intervene that influence not only individual experiences, but also structural levels of inequality with goals of inclusion will be discussed.

 

Presenter: Julie Hau, Project Manager, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

11:45 a.m.

12:15 p.m.

Break - Exhibit Area Open

12:15 p.m.

12:45 p.m.

Lunch

12:45 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

Afternoon Activities

   

Performance – Dasha Hamilton

   

Next Step Facilitated Discussion

 

 

Introduction of Closing Speaker

   

Closing Speaker

   

Send Off