2020 Breakout Details Schedule

Session # Session Title Description Presenters
1. Leadership for Cultural Sustainability Increasing workplace participation demands that we create culturally sustaining workplaces where individuals "show up" in their own unique way. This requires leaders to think differently about the cultural norms of their organization that may dictate policies and practices. Borrowing from the framework of culturally responsive and sustaining educational practices, explore how workplace effectiveness can be positively impacted through the development of culturally sustaining leadership practices. This presentation will share cultural insights gained through the presenter's Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad experience which included examining teamwork, communication, and conflict management in Hmong villages of Northern Thailand. Participants will examine strategies for increasing their cultural responsive practices to create organizations that encourage all team members to engage in their own unique way.  Deb Clarke, Chippewa Valley Technical College, Leadership and Organizational Development Instructor
2. Meeting Your Employer Needs by Hiring and Retaining Wisconsisn's Offender Population Hiring and retaining those with conviction records can be persistently challenging for employers despite a robust economy with low unemployment. Yet Wisconsin’s offender population has real potential to meet employers’ needs. In this session, learn about: 1. The potential workforce in Wisconsin’s correctional system. 2. The real story from those engaged in a successful effort in Southeast Wisconsin bringing together diverse stakeholders to have an impact for employers and prospective employees with barriers to employment. Jim Golembeski, Bay Area Workforce Development Board, Executive Director; Amy Greil, UW-Madison Division of Extension, Associate Professor/Community Development Educator
3. Unlock the Power of Belonging to Deliver Exceptional Outcomes Devin Halliday, author of “Belonging Factor: How Great Brands and Great Leaders Inspire Loyalty, Build Community, and Grow Profits,” provides techniques to unlock the power of diversity, inclusion, and belonging. This engaging and interactive workshop gets you ready to leverage that power to inspire loyalty, build community, and grow profits. Outcomes include: 1. Why a culture of belonging is the greatest driver of innovation, collaboration, and exceptional outcomes? 2. What a culture of belonging includes?  3. How to structure an organization to allow that culture to exist? 4. How to build a sense of purpose and belonging for yourself and those you lead? Devin Halliday, Rudiment Solutions, Chief Belonging Officer
20. How Faith Communities Help Us Heal from Acts of Hate, Discrimination and Oppression Individuals across Wisconsin are suffering daily from acts of discrimination, hate, and oppression--tragically, even violence. When families and individuals suffer, we are all losers and our communities suffer from marginalization, trivialization and normalization of such behavior and its consequences. It affects educational attainment, economic stability, mental wellness, and even community reputation. If there is anything we have learned in recent years, prayer alone in the face of tragedy is not sufficient to change bad behavior and policy. This session will address why people get used to suffering via systemic oppression and how to overcome habituation; how faith communities open us up or close us off to experiences and suffering of others and ourselves; and how faith communities help build stronger social fabric to prevent these things in the future. This session will also explore multiple ways that faith communities encourage healing and catalyze action on the front lines of hatred and discrimination. Rev. Tory Topjian, Milwaukee Metropolitan Community Church, Senior Minister; Pardeep Kaleka, Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee, Executive Director;  Rev. Bridget Daniels, Union Congregational United Church of Christ, Senior Minister;  Rev. Rachel Knoke, Trinity Lutheran Green Bay, Senior Minister
21. To be announced    
22. Baraboo Gathers, Baraboo Talks, Baraboo Acts After a photo of Baraboo High School Senior boys appearing to give the Nazi salute went viral in the fall of 2018 community, civic, business and faith members of the community gathered to find ways to heal from this painful event. After an initial series of community discussions to process and heal, it became clear that many residents do not feel welcome and comfortable in Baraboo. Creating a welcoming community where all voices are heard is an ongoing process and Baraboo is just beginning to address these issues. The Baraboo Acts Coalition was formed to ensure that the Baraboo Community will continue to collaborate with current and new partners so that all voices are at the table to inform our next steps. All communities in Wisconsin are dealing with the same issues that have come to the forefront in Baraboo. Don’t wait until something explosive happens in your community. This panel will share insights and actions you can bring to your own community. Alex Paulson, Baraboo Acts Coalition, and Baraboo School District, Co-Chair of the Baraboo Acts Coalition; Marcy Huffaker, Baraboo Acts Coalition, Co-Chair of the Baraboo Acts Coalition; Dr. Lori Mueller, Baraboo School District, District Administrator; Alene Bolin, Sauk County, Sauk County Administrator;  Mike Palm, City of Baraboo, Mayor;   Nanci Caflisch, Baraboo Chamber of Commerce, Former President of the Chamber of Commerce; Susana Guerrero Martinez, Baraboo High School, Student
40. Understanding the Hmong Experience through a Cultural and Historic Lens  This presentation is based on my participation in the 2019 Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad. This grant supported 12 secondary and post-secondary educators to travel to Thailand for a four-week seminar focused on Hmong history and culture. The objectives of this presentation are to improve Hmong historical and cultural understanding and expand support of the region’s Hmong population. There will be a historical overview of the Hmong Diaspora, an explanation of the difference between refugees, immigrants, and asylum seekers, a historical and generational experience of the Hmong’s transition into American culture, and a nursing student’s experience and transition into health care. Lin J. Rauch, MSN-Ed., RN, BSN, BS Ed., Western Technical College
41. Learn how to Increase Equity, Promote Inclusion and Foster Safety Learn from an Inclusivity Specialist how to increase equity, promote inclusion and foster safety in this lively session. Maslow before Bloom indeed! If students/staff don't feel safe they won't succeed, walk away with some tools to help them thrive! Lisa is a former school counselor, state and national leader, and is currently writing a book on LGBTQ+ resources. She has received her Diversity & Inclusion Certification from Cornell University. Attendees will walk away with knowing how to SHOW inclusivity, how to SHARE their stories and experiences in order to SHAPE policies in their schools as well as in their communities. Lisa in on a quest to help Toward One Wisconsin build communities of Equity AND Opportunity! Oh, and we'll have FUN! Lisa A Koenecke, Inclusion Ally, Lakeland University, Inclusivity Specialist 
42. Exploring Native Higher Education Pathways and the American Indian Board School Experience This workshop will explore the differences and provide a cultural response for student success.  With the use of a constructive pedagogy we will promote discipline thought and simplify understanding for a better understanding of Native persistence within academia to degree attainment. In addition, attendees will gain a better understanding of the historical trauma experienced as a result of attending a boarding school.  Attendees will gain a deeper understanding of how this trauma is inter-generational. This journey includes a historical review of the Boarding School Era with details of student experiences while attending the Lutheran Indian Mission School located in Red Springs, Wisconsin. The session will emphasize the importance of building relationships and trust while simultaneously acknowledging that there is no such thing as a bad child; only a bad memory. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Director of Education and Career Services
60A. An Approach to Health Equity at a Local Healthcare Organization Dr. Michelle Minikel, a family medicine physician at Bellin's Clinica Hispana, along with the colleagues will discuss the work that Bellin, a health care organization serving approximately 172,000 people in Northeastern Wisconsin, has taken to address health equity. Attendees will learn about Bellin's health outcome data collection and the inequities that were uncovered in the system, what initiatives have been launched by the health equity committee to date, the challenges and successes that have occurred, and future plans to improve health equity in Northeast Wisconsin. Participants will receive concrete steps that can be taken at their health care organizations to help improve equity. The importance of working together as a team will be a unifying theme.  Michelle Minikel, BSN, BS, MD, Bellin's Clinica Hispana, Family Physician;  Maggie Koch, BSN, BS, RN, Bellin's Clinica Hispana, Equity Team Leader;    Iraidy Ramos, Bellin's Clinica Hispana, Clinic Director
60B. Plugging the Holes: Pivotal Role of Foreign-Trained Medical Doctors in Reforming Health Inequities by Delivering Primary Care in Rural Areas of the Midwest  This session will: 1. Describe how foreign-trained medical doctors (FTMD) are positively contributing to resolving health inequities in rural Wisconsin by currently filling up the need in delivering basic preventive care in rural areas of the Midwest and the entire United States. 2. Focus on how current immigration laws are restricting FTMD in serving the underserved. 3. Personal stories of up to four FMTD on the panel describing how current practicing FTMD face continued struggle with restrictive immigration policies and the impact on health care needs in underserved areas in the absence of FTMD. 4. Opportunity for the attendees to discuss questions with the panel. Sonal Chandratre, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin-Central Wisconsin Campus, Pediatric Endocrinology, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
61.  To be announced    
62. Trauma Informed Court Room Practices: Dismantling the Child Welfare to Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Prison Pipeline This session is designed to describe the child welfare to juvenile delinquency to adult prison pipeline in juvenile justice within Wisconsin. The pipeline passes traumatized children from one system to the next without addressing the deeply held trauma and mental health needs of young people and their families, thereby ultimately leaving them without the emotional and intellectual skills necessary to live a happy and productive adult life. Disparities are greatly manifested within these systems. Attendees will gain insight into the health needs of children within the juvenile justice system explained by a judge who has the primary responsibility of ensuring overall well being of the children. Attendees will also learn and see how untreated trauma and mental health creates a crisis in the lives of families Honorable/Reverend Everett Mitchell, M.Div., Th.M., J.D., Dane County Circuit Court Judge; Senior Pastor, Christ the Solid Rock Baptist Church; Adjunct Professor University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School
Session # Session Title Description Presenters
4. Beyond Good Intentions: Realistic Action for Organizational Change Demographic change, a shifting political landscape, and an intensifying demand for diversity and inclusion in the workplace require organizations to move beyond “good intentions” and general value statements. Organizations that fail to address diversity and inclusion effectively will not be able to leverage the skill set and expertise of an increasingly diverse population and will struggle to grow as well as adapt to both complex and competitive working conditions. Participants will be exposed to simple tools and strategies for gaining traction in creating diverse and inclusive work environments that may increase the ability to attract and retain employees of color and increase employee satisfaction, creativity, problem-solving, and innovation. Learn about how to identify opportunities and realistic strategies to engage your organization in honest and critical conversation; practice introspection; assist in information gathering and research; and go beyond “good intentions.” Kristina Shelton, YWCA Greater Green B
5. Assessing Organizational Racism and Advocating for Anti-Racist Work Spaces           Part 1 of 2 Creating and supporting teams with diverse skills, knowledge, and experiences is essential to developing vibrant workplaces where we value people and leverage their talents. Yet, workplaces persist where racism continues to disrupt employee engagement, belonging, collaboration, innovation and productivity. With time and intention, organizations, like individuals, can evolve to become anti-racist. In this session, we'll explore evaluative tools to determine how racism shows up in your organization. From decision-making and budgeting to accountability and power, you’ll have a chance to think about your work environment and learn ways to advocate for the change necessary to transform individuals, teams, and organizations. Attendees will be able to identify areas for growth with their own organization and leave prepared to develop strategic plans to move from their current state to an anti-racist, inclusive organization. Deborah A Biddle, The People Company
6. Creating a Supportive and Inclusive Workplace for Employees with Mental Health Conditions According to the World Health Organization, depression and anxiety cost the global economy more than $1 trillion in lost productivity annually. More and more employers are recognizing the challenges that mental health conditions, especially if untreated, can cause in the workplace. Employers must walk a fine line between creating an inclusive culture and following the law, all the while keeping their business or organization running in an effective manner. So, what can be done? This session will shed light on how to find the proper balance while recognizing the often unseen struggles of those living with mental health issues. Please join us for a practical discussion where we will present strategies for supporting employees with mental health conditions, providing reasonable accommodations and reducing the stigma associated with mental health. We’ll also specifically address common legal pitfalls when complying with ADA, FMLA, and other leave/accommodation laws.  Bret McKitrick, JD, Associated Bank - Associated Benefits and Risk Consulting, SVP, Senior Compliance and Workplace Consultant
23. How Faith Communities Help Us Heal from Acts of Hate, Discrimination and Oppression Individuals across Wisconsin are suffering daily from acts of discrimination, hate, and oppression--tragically, even violence. When families and individuals suffer, we are all losers and our communities suffer from marginalization, trivialization and normalization of such behavior and its consequences. It affects educational attainment, economic stability, mental wellness, and even community reputation. If there is anything we have learned in recent years, prayer alone in the face of tragedy is not sufficient to change bad behavior and policy. This session will address why people get used to suffering via systemic oppression and how to overcome habituation; how faith communities open us up or close us off to experiences and suffering of others and ourselves; and how faith communities help build stronger social fabric to prevent these things in the future. This session will also explore multiple ways that faith communities encourage healing and catalyze action on the front lines of hatred and discrimination. Rev. Tory Topjian, Milwaukee Metropolitan Community Church, Senior Minister; Pardeep Kaleka, Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee, Executive Director;  Rev. Bridget Daniels, Union Congregational United Church of Christ, Senior Minister;  Rev. Rachel Knoke, Trinity Lutheran Green Bay, Senior Minister
24. RISE UP: Using Participatory Mural Arts to Foster Resilience and  Connection Within Marginalized Populations In this session you will hear from RISE UP, a non-profit mural arts program in Central Wisconsin whose mission is to build teams of artists, service providers, program participants, and other community stakeholders to collaborate on transformative public art projects. The connections being created through this process have been powerful forces in strengthening our community. Attendees will learn about the trauma-informed collaborative process of mural generation whose final product is a canvas of diverse, connected, and vibrant voices. Attendees will be able to hear from individuals that have participated in each one of the RISE UP projects to understand how this process helped them to build confidence, connect to their community, and break down stigma. Tara Draeger, Aspirus and RISE UP of Central Wisconsin, Inc., System Director of Community Health Improvement and RISE UP Vice President; Christy Keele, JD, RISE UP of Central Wisconsin, Inc., RISE UP Board President; Faith Wilfley, MD, RISE UP of Central Wisconsin, Inc., RISE UP Evaluation Supervisor and Executive Board Member;  Daniel Shine, North Central Health Care and RISE UP of Central Wisconsin, Inc., Medication Assisted Treatment Coordinator and RISE UP Executive Board Member
25. 2020 Waking Up White Regional Community Learning Collaborative This Collaborative, which involves hundreds of people, is a multi-year effort to engage the La Crosse region in courageous conversations about race. There are three main components of the Collaborative: the Creating a Healthier Multicultural Community Project, the Regional Read of Debby Irving’s book, “Waking Up White” and holding the White Privilege Symposium that will be coming to La Crosse in October of 2020. Patrick Lunney, Creating a Healthier Multicultural Community, Co-leader;  Thomas Harris, UW-La Crosse, Assistant Director, Office of Multicultural Student Services; Diana Diaz Grandos, Better Together in LaCrosse County, Project Evaluator
43. What is the T in LGBTQIA+ As we begin to better understand sexual orientation and gender identity, educators are seeking ways to create more inclusive spaces for non-binary members of our educational communities. This session will cultivate equity in education by sharing best practices and strategies for supporting transgender and other non-binary students in the classroom and on campus. Attend this session to become more adept at creating an inclusive campus community for LGBTQIA+ persons and others. Explore the difference between biological sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation and learn best practices and strategies for supporting transgender students in the classroom and on campus. Jeremy Pagel, Lakeshore Technical College, Sociology and Diversity Studies Instructor;                                           Nicole M. Yang, Lakeshore Technical College, Advisor and Diversity Services Manager      
44. Increasing Equity in Dual Enrollment White students in the US are twice as likely to enroll in dual enrollment classes as their African American or Latino peers. The College in High School Alliance and LevelUP has provided recommendations for state policies that advance the goals of equity and quality for college in high school programs. Learn how Wisconsin has aligned to these recommendations and what local districts can do to increase equity in dual enrollment, including special education students. Karin Smith, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Academic and Career Planning and Dual Enrollment Consultant, Division for Academic Excellence;  Charles Clark, University of Wisconsin System, Director of High School Relations, Office of Academic & Student Affairs Ann Westrich, Wisconsin Technical College System, Education Director, Career Prep, Office of Student Success;  Rebecca Larsen, Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Senior Vice President for Advocacy                 
45. Equity in the Classroom: A Collaboration Between the WTCS, UW System, and WAICU It is powerful to have all three higher educational systems working together, especially when the challenge at hand regards equity. Increased collaboration between these systems, state agencies, and organizations in general is something to consistently encourage. Each of the post-secondary systems in the state has identified the need to address inequity in higher education. One of the most important components of system-wide equity efforts is discussing how faculty understands and embrace equity and inclusion in the classroom. Listen to representatives from each system discuss how they came together to collaborate on an event for faculty and a goal to increase equity in credential attainment in our state. Attendees will take away examples of how to start and maintain successful collaborations. Kristen Long, Wisconsin Technical College System, Education Director-Faculty Quality Assurance and Professional Learning ; Chrystal Seeley-Schreck, Wisconsin Technical College System, Associate Vice President- Office of Instructional Services; Fay Yokomizo Akindes, UW System, Director- System wide Professional and Instructional Development; Cassandra Krause, Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (WAICU), Director of Communications and Marketing 
63A. The Hunger Environmental and Nutrition (HEN) Project at MATC Join us as we share the vision of the Hunger Environmental and Nutrition (HEN) Project of Milwaukee Area Technical College to build health equity using food and education access as the cure. This ongoing project is a Service Learning Collaborative of Dietetic Technician, Dietetics Management, and Culinary Programs.  The objectives of the session is: 1) To identify resources to create education programming which impact community needs in the area of food/nutrition; 2) To view health disparities with a comprehensive global program planning lens; 3) To outline steps to build health-focused education using an innovative collaborative approach; and 4) To illustrate a framework of inclusivity that creates health equity facilitated by a Wisconsin Technical College located in one of the poorest, most diverse cities in the nation. Heidi Katte, MS, RDN, CD, FAND, Milwaukee Area Technical College,  Program Coordinator and Faculty; Megan Cary, MS, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Center for Engaged and Service Learning Campus Liaison and Faculty
63B. The Intersection of Health Equity and Kindergarten Readiness How can a community address equity issues with preparing the foundation of our workforce (a.k.a. kindergartners)? Learn how one local health department is incorporating health equity into their developmental screenings and kindergarten readiness work with the support of the early childhood coalition from using area deprivation data to identify priority urban neighborhoods to strategies for earning trust among residents. Hear lessons learned and successes from a fledgling effort.  Liz Nelson, Kenosha County Division of Health, Health Services Coordinator;  Becky Miller, Kenosha County Division of Health, Public Health Nurse
64. A Plan for Reducing Mass Incarceration in Wisconsin Despite long competing economic structures and political forces that have encouraged mass incarceration, a prison abolition movement is gaining traction in Wisconsin. This presentation sets a baseline for understanding causes of today’s prison epidemic (incarceration as punishment; discrimination in arrests, convictions and sentencing; dysfunctional probation system; etc.) towards an actionable plan to significantly reduce the prison population. Alternative courts; sentence guideline reforms; work release programs; probation reform; new approaches to policing; and the closing of some existing prisons are part of the solution. A panel of criminal justice professionals and prison exonerees share perspectives and recommendations based on lived experience. Attendees will come away from the presentation will a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of Wisconsin’s incarceration epidemic. They will also learn basic facts about our criminal justice system and how it prejudices arrests, convictions and incarceration of black men (among others). Attendees will also gain information about the prison abolition movement—its origins, its effects, and how to engage with the movement to effect change. John A. Birdsall, Birdsall Obear & Associates SC, Attorney; Keith Findley, UW-Madison Law School, Professor, Co-Director of The Innocence Project; Jarrett Adams, Attorney, Exoneree 
65.  Building a Path for Health Equity with Communities of Color Community engagement, particularly with communities of color, is perhaps one of the biggest challenges for many organizations. In this session, participants will be able to increase their understanding about the challenges that impact the health of Latinos in Wisconsin. Attendees will also learn about the equity approach of the Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers in Milwaukee that has allowed low income residents and families to have access to quality healthcare, improved overall physical and mental health, and become change makers in the transformation of their own neighborhood. Through sharing successful real-life examples and best practices in the presentation and conversation, attendees will have a more robust appreciation and understanding about the importance of making social, environmental, and racial justice priorities in decision-making related to neighborhood and community development. Attendees will also receive practical tools to engage effectively with their own communities in a way that is equitable and successful. Tatiana Maida, Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers, Obesity Department Manager; Jamie Ferschinger, Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers, Director of Environmental Health
Session # Session Title Description Presenters
7. Step Up Inclusive Hiring Before we can start stepping up to make change happen in our workplace, we need to step inside. Understanding how we think and perceive the world is an important first step in creating sustainable change. Hosted by Step Up: Equity Matters, this interactive workshop offers an understanding of how biases shape our views of the people around us and how these biases can get in the way of building an inclusive workplace. Participants will take time to reflect on their inner biases to learn how to move beyond guilt and toward positive intention and action. We will guide participants to recognize and own their biases with compassion for self and for community, then disrupt them to create a work environment where diverse talent thrives, innovation is promoted, and retention in Wisconsin's workplaces is valued. Amy Kesling, Step Up: Equity Matters, Cofounder and Lead Facilitator; Tania Ibarra, Step Up: Equity Matters, Cofounder and Lead Facilitator
8. Assessing Organizational Racism and Advocating for Anti-Racist Work Spaces-Part 2 of 2 Creating and supporting teams with diverse skills, knowledge, and experiences is essential to developing vibrant workplaces where we value people and leverage their talents. Yet, workplaces persist where racism continues to disrupt employee engagement, belonging, collaboration, innovation and productivity. With time and intention, organizations, like individuals, can evolve to become anti-racist. In this session, we'll explore evaluative tools to determine how racism shows up in your organization. From decision-making and budgeting to accountability and power, you’ll have a chance to think about your work environment and learn ways to advocate for the change necessary to transform individuals, teams, and organizations. Attendees will be able to identify areas for growth with their own organization and leave prepared to develop strategic plans to move from their current state to an anti-racist, inclusive organization. Deborah A Biddle, The People Company
9. Overcoming Barriers for Employing Those with Disabilities Mallory will share strategies to collaborate with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and area Employment Service Agencies such as VaryAbility, LLC to recruit and retain individuals with disabilities. These recruitment strategies include job customization, temporary work experiences, job shadowing, and building relationships with Employment Service Agencies. Whether you are a manager, HR representative, or coworker, you will learn strategies to support these employees by using accommodations, job aides, and collaborating with a job coach. Attendees will also have a better understanding of the role of an employment consultant and job coach. Mallory Cornelius, VaryAbility, LLC, F
26. A Plan for Reducing Mass Incarceration in Wisconsin Despite long competing economic structures and political forces that have encouraged mass incarceration, a prison abolition movement is gaining traction in Wisconsin. This presentation sets a baseline for understanding causes of today’s prison epidemic (incarceration as punishment; discrimination in arrests, convictions and sentencing; dysfunctional probation system; etc.) towards an actionable plan to significantly reduce the prison population. Alternative courts; sentence guideline reforms; work release programs; probation reform; new approaches to policing; and the closing of some existing prisons are part of the solution. A panel of criminal justice professionals and prison exonerees share perspectives and recommendations based on lived experience. Attendees will come away from the presentation will a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of Wisconsin’s incarceration epidemic. They will also learn basic facts about our criminal justice system and how it prejudices arrests, convictions and incarceration of black men (among others). Attendees will also gain information about the prison abolition movement—its origins, its effects, and how to engage with the movement to effect change. John A. Birdsall, Birdsall Obear & Associates SC, Attorney; Keith Findley, UW-Madison Law School, Professor, Co-Director of The Innocence Project; Jarrett Adams, Attorney, Exoneree 
27. You’re the Inspiration! It’s not just a lyric from the hit Chicago song, it’s also the way we may inadvertently offend people with disabilities. Wait, how is that offensive; I’m being nice? This session will explore when well-intentions akin to “I don’t see color” actually perpetuate stereotypes and create distance between people. Throughout the session we’ll explore our (possibly) hidden discomfort, bias, and outward expression of these surrounding disability. Attendees will be challenged to recognize and address in their own circles of influence these microaggressions that pack quite a punch. Rachel Swatloski, Chippewa Valley Tech
28. Participatory Philanthropy: Case Study and Model for Inclusive Community Building In this workshop, the NextGen Participatory Philanthropy Model that brings together people of different economic means who often don't see themselves as change agents or philanthropists can be empowered as positive influencers in their communities. The NextGen Participatory Philanthropy Model embodies and furthers IDEA by helping members be aware of their community's issues, offers a method for acting on those issues, and by advancing the conversation between groups that do not often converse with each other. The Giving Circle model offers a first-hand experience of transforming a group's talent, time, and treasure into real change. Attendees will leave this session with a roadmap for how they can replicate this approach in their communities. The model supports diversity, equity, and inclusion practices in the recruitment, selection of participants, and in the philanthropic process itself. Kelvin Alfaro, Campus Compact for Wisc
46. The Guide for White Women who Teach Black Boys This workshop will introduce” The Guide for White Women Teaching Black Boys.” The guide was created to support White women to engage in concentrated, focused inquiry around their relationships with Black male students, and the impact on those relationships of race and racism. To effectively support students to move through the gates (which are what great teachers do) rather than closing off student access, teachers need to be able to see students clearly, to connect with them authentically, and to understand the way the gates are already rigged to make it harder for Black students to move through them. For White teachers to be allies to their Black male students, they have to understand not only their students, but the struggles their students incur simply by being Black and male in the US. Participants will work through activities that may challenge them, require honest reflection on their whiteness, and will reflect on their role in possibly perpetuating an inherently white and privileged society. The sessions will support White teachers in their search for personal growth as educators and the academic achievement of their Black male students.  Marguerite W. Penick-Parks, PhD, Unive
47. Equity-Minded High-Impact Practices: Pedagogy and Program Development  We will share the development of a project to make “high-impact practices” (HIP) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay more inclusive and explore the qualities that research shows make high-impact practices distinctive and particularly beneficial for historically marginalized students. We’ll help attendees reflect on how pedagogy and curriculum might change if these students are centered. Our session is useful for anyone interested in engaged learning, increasing equity along multiple axes, and beginning the slow work of institutional culture-change. Participants will have the opportunity to consider how their organization, classroom, or work relates to making equity-minded HIPs a priority.  Alison Staudinger, University of Wisconsin Green Bay, Co-Director, Center for Civic Engagement; Associate Professor, Democracy and Justice Studies; Caroline Boswell, University of Wisconsin Green Bay, Director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning; Associate Professor, History and Humanities 
48A.  Droppin' Knowledge On 'Em - Building a Sustainable Diversity Education Model At NWTC, we are committed to embracing the worth of every individual and promoting an environment that fosters intellectual and personal discovery. A way of putting this into practice is through an educational framework that consists of employee required and elective diversity programming, a recognition program under the umbrella of our iRespect! Brand, as well as a student co-curricular programming and a year-long leadership experience. Participants will learn: (1) to vision and frame a common understanding and alignment of diversity education and (2) the importance of building a universal diversity brand, partnership, and accountability to sustain a diversity education model. Kristine Kuhn, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist/Human Resources
48B. You, You got What I Need - Now let's get Together: What Biz Markie and Al Green Know About Equity in Education Innovation One of the biggest challenges in education innovation is connecting the meaningful input, ideas, and needs of those most impacted by inequity with those who may have the technical knowledge or power to help bring about actual change. Learn and practice models from participatory school design, community organizing, and charter school development to learn ways to leverage the expertise of everyone in your community to make change or implement a new idea. Attendees will take away tangible models and frameworks to apply in their own communities and contexts to move from big problems and needs to specific issues, policies, programs, and solutions. Given the interactive nature of the session we also expect new connections within the session, shared examples, and applications in other contexts. Aaron Seligman, UW System, Director - Office of Educational Opportunity; Sean Anderson, Milestone Democratic School, School Developer
66. To be announced    
67A. Nicotine Addiction and the Teen Brain: The Perfect Storm for a Public Health Disaster The vaping epidemic is here and posing a challenge to providers, schools, parents and public health. Teens are especially vulnerable to the on-line availability, unlicensed sales, glitzy marketing, and colorful and concealable nicotine delivery devices. Brain maturation and development is not complete so teens are more likely to seek exhilaration, novelty without having the prefrontal brain development that acts as a brake on risky behavior. Teens want to fit in and be accepted so they may give in to peer pressure and try vaping. Currently providers are seeing more nicotine product use and signs of nicotine addiction by teens (athletes, high GPA, college bound or at college, etc.) who would not previously have thought about smoking a cigarettes. They do not believe they will get addicted or that it is dangerous. Nicotine is addicting another generation. Through shared knowledge and working together with providers, schools, families, public health and our lawmakers we can turn around this concerning trend.  We can help them! James A Meyer MD, Marshfield Clinic , A
67B. Using Data to Drive Action Understanding and using data to drive action is critical to community efforts to improve health and equity. This interactive session will give participants early in this journey tools and resources that can be used to engage partners in a data-focused approach. Data can help answer a question, explain or describe characteristics of a population, or tell a story. Put simply, data are pieces of information that help us understand the world in which we live. Importantly, data can help you understand community conditions and figure out if they promote or discourage good health. Data can help you identify and understand inequities in your community. This skill-building workshop will explore different types of data and how you can use data to identify and understand inequities.  Joe Hinton, University of Wisconsin Pop
68. Health Promotion Activities for Latino Youth in a Faith-Based Community Perceptions of family health and well-being, available resources, and decision-making impact health promoting behaviors. Faith-based organizations can effectively support health promotion programs in at risk communities. This session has two purposes: to present a childhood obesity intervention in a faith setting for Latino families; and to report well-being and patterns of decision-making within the family unit related to dietary intake, physical activity, and environmental resources. Discussion of barriers and future opportunities in faith-based community health work will be shared among participants in a way which fosters inclusivity and mutual learning. This presentation is an opportunity to start the conversation and synthesize the collective knowledge and experience among the attendees. The aim of this workshop is not to bring about end goals, but to help refine the community based participatory research process in faith-based settings. Martin Mikell, PhD, RN, CEN, Medical College of Wisconsin, Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Family and Community Medicine;  Mary Bullis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Doctoral Student; Pam Treisman, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Doctoral Candidatel   Cynthia Gonzalez, MSN, RN, OCNS-C, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Doctoral Student
Session # Session Title Description Presenters
10. COVERING It has now been many years since the diversity and inclusion revolution swept the corporate world. Today, many Fortune 500 companies have an impressive array of programs focused on the needs of a diverse workforce. Yet reports suggest that full inclusion remains elusive. Why? One potential answer is that these initiatives may not have lived up to the core ideal of inclusion, which is to allow individuals to bring their authentic selves to work. Most inclusion efforts have not explicitly and rigorously addressed the pressure to conform that prevents individuals from realizing that ideal, and the resultant tendency to cover. Learn a behavioral model that leaders can use to mitigate the occurrence and impact of covering – reflect, diagnose, analyze, initiate. Apply these mitigation tactics and strategies to increase cultural dexterity across global, generational and gender-based differences.   Suri Surinder, CTR Factor, Inc., CEO
11. The Shifting Talent Landscape: What does that mean for your Organization? The Talent Acquisition landscape is dynamic and a shift is occurring. Organizations need to adjust the way they recruit and hire to broaden their talent pool and increase inclusion within their organization. Candidates are taking non-traditional career paths and changing industries and professions. In this session, we will not only share critical information about the new talent landscape but we will also give participants best practices that have worked and are currently being implemented across companies to capture this talent. Attendees will walk away seeing how the candidate market is shifting and organizations need to be innovative and think outside the box to be more inclusive.  The war of talent has begun and we hope to equip participants with resources that will assist their organizations. D.J. Daniels, Schreiber Foods, Inc., Team Leader, Talent Acquisiton;  Kate Wesolowski, Associated Bank, Senior Vice President - Talent Acquisition Manager; Callie Davis, Associated Bank, Diversity & Inclusion Talent Specialist
12. Health Workers, Healthy Wisconsin Project  Marginalized jobseekers often suffer from unaddressed health needs which can mitigate against their success in the world of work. Our three partners: Community Advocates, UW Milwaukee and Covering Wisconsin are engaged with workforce development programs and agencies to embed assessments for health services with a trauma screening tool. Participants will gain a clear understanding of the interdependence of economic well being and overall human health; a basic knowledge of economic policies and practices that can contribute to the economic health and well being of marginalized communities; and how these can be more widely adopted in the state to address the economic needs of impoverished communities, rural and urban. Conor Williams, Community Advocates
29. Using Storytelling as a Tool for Inclusive Community Building Social isolation is among prevalent health risks impacting elders and those living with memory loss, dementia, and other cognitive impairments. This session will provide an overview of the TimeSlips storytelling philosophy (drawn primarily from concepts of improvisation) and how creativity can be used to reduce the stigma and stereotypes surrounding cognitive impairments. A group storytelling demonstration and two case studies of the work in action will be shared: one intergenerational collaboration between a university and elder care community and one collaboration between community artists and a day center for adults of all ages living with physical and cognitive impairments.  Kari Hanson, TimeSlips, NextGen Project Manager; Elaine Maly, TimeSlips, Project Manager and Master Trainer
30. I am in Wisconsin, and now what? This session will be an occasion to layout some difficulties that African Immigrants are facing, share our live experiences, and acknowledge that education in Wisconsin is not always a panacea to stay in Wisconsin and build a family. However, it is very important, as an immigrant, to have a good education in order to have a positive impact on the future generation of African Immigrants. Information will be shared on the Wisconsin African Community Advocate organization. The rational explaining the idea of an advocacy group for Africans and a summary of the work done by the Wisconsin African Community Advocates to fulfil its mission statement will be shared. In addition, the panelists will try to answer the question of why Africans come to Wisconsin and will explain the ways in which being an inclusive community can be beneficial to all. Nicaise Mbunteu, Wisconsin African Community Advocate, Treasurer;  George Azeh, Wisconsin African Community Advocate, President; Fossi Symphorien, Wisconsin African Community Advocate, Vice President; Yollande Tchouapi, Wisconsin African Community Advocate, Vice President Public Relations and Communication
31. The Voices of ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Individuals in Brown County A flourishing community starts with healthy, secure individuals and families. How different would Wisconsin be if every household earned enough to not just survive, but thrive? What if individuals and families could not only meet their basic needs, but also save for emergencies and their future? For decades, our understanding of what it means to struggle in our communities, both in Wisconsin and throughout the nation, has been limited due to the lack of high-quality research-based information that goes beyond traditional measures like Federal Poverty Level data. The 2016 and 2018 Wisconsin ALICE Reports shed much needed light on the challenges of working individuals and families. In 2018, Brown County United Way set a community goal: 10,000 individuals on the path to stability in 10 years. This goal is based upon the 2018 ALICE Report for Wisconsin which found that an estimated 1 in 3 households in Brown County live below a basic cost of living. The results of our first Voices of ALICE focus group will be shared. Robyn Davis, Brown County United Day, President and CEO;  Sarah Inman, Brown County United Way, Vice President of Community Investment; Said Hassan, Brown County United Way, Research and Evaluation Manager; Jill Sobieck, Brown County United Way, Impact Initiatives and Outreach Manager
49. Building Equity in High School Graduation Rates Wisconsin has the largest achievement gap between black and white students’ graduation rates. To improve our community and the outcome of our high school graduation rate, teachers and youth program specialists should utilize a system of identifying students that are at risk of dropping out of high school. When a student is recognized to have risk factors of dropping out, there are many approaches that can be taken. Achieve Brown County has worked with mentoring organizations and school district partners to produce a systems approach to detect students that are at risk, determine why the student is at risk, and finally deliver the appropriate support for the student. In this session attendees will learn ways to identify and support the students who are at risk of dropping out of high school. Kennedy Metoxen, Achieve Brown County, Continuous Improvement Coordinator; Ann McCotter, Achieve Brown County, Director of Continous Improvement; Eric Vandenheuvel, Boys and Girls Club of Greater Green Bay, Interim Executive Director; Vicki Bayer, Green Bay Area Public School District, Associate Superintendent
50. Education and Cultural Diversity The right to speak and to be heard is fundamental to the advancement of the cause of social justice. Are we ready to listen to the voices of refugee and immigrant youth? Large numbers of immigrant and refugee youth are present in public schools in the United States, yet services to meet their needs are often lacking. There are few opportunities for bilingual education or support in secondary school settings. Coupled with heavy academic requirements and difficulty of fitting in common to adolescence, refugee and immigrant youth often find themselves silenced, isolated from the school and larger community (Berry, Phinney, Sam & Vedder, 2006). Schools often do not have the resources to support programs for students during the summer, a key time to continue social and academic language progress. Participants will be introduced to individuals who have navigated the challenges facing immigrants and refugees as they pursued their educational journeys.  Don Hones, UW-Oshkosh, Professor; Jessica Martinez, UW Oshkosh, Preservice Teacher; Sabrina Samo, Fox Valley Technical College, Student
51. Equity Through a Different Lens: The Tyranny of Time “Knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged” (Continental Congress, 1787). Even before ratification of the Constitution, access to education was recognized as a national priority. Since then, we’ve taken notable steps to improve access and its relative, equity, but much remains to be done. This session looks at equity through a different lens — one that exposes the tyranny of time. Perhaps because time is easily measured, its use as a proxy for learning pervades higher education. There’s a problem. It’s wrong. The presenters hope to spark thoughtful reflection on how we have failed a large segment of potential learners (mostly adults with little or no college who are working part-time or variable hours) by insisting that they reorganize their lives as a prerequisite to pursuing the promises of higher education. We do not claim to have a silver-bullet solution, but as the only Wisconsin Technical College System school currently accredited by HLC to offer Competency-Based Education (CBE) programs, we will share how and why Nicolet College's identified CBE as the best way, given our mission and circumstances, to overcome time-driven inequities. Richard Nelson, Nicolet College, President; Kathleen Ferrel, Nicolet College, Executive Vice President
69. What Works? Social and Economic Opportunities to Improve Health for All How are you taking action to address the social determinants of health and increase equity in your community? How do you find policies and programs that can help you make a difference? How do you know if they will work? This session will provide examples of concrete, effective solutions to address challenges across the social determinants of health with particular attention to strategies that decrease disparities. It will also introduce you to an online resource that will bring evidence to your fingertips-- What Works for Health-- and have an opportunity to explore strategies that can improve social and economic opportunities locally. You will leave with a better understanding of the nuances of strategy selection and a personalized action plan with strategies to explore further. Jessica Solcz, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, Evidence Analyst; Joe Hinton, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, Action Learning Coach
70A. Being Intentional about Equity in Practice: Saving you and your Organization/Group from Headache and Heartache Taking the time to develop process and the formulation of processes can be the step in an organization/group working on equity that is daunting. This presentation aims to break down, from another organization’s perspective, how that process can look when members are heard and there is intention to the agreements that are put in place. This presentation will also address the difficulties that have arisen while working on this process and what the impact of working through the tensions and conflicts can lead to in the future. This presentation will demonstrate why a process was intentional and what that means when working on equity. Participants will be able to see where they are in the process of working on equity. Decision-making tools and insights on consensus as a process will be shared. Susan Garcia Franz, Winnebago County Health Department, Well Woman Program Coordinator; Heidi Keating, Outagamie County Health Department, Community Health Educator 
70B. Home is Where Your Health Is: Policies to Improve the Health of Renters in Milwaukee and Beyond Attendees will learn about and discuss the results of the Community Advocates Public Policy Institute's Healthy Housing Initiative, a multi-year effort to diagnose the acute and direct link between health and housing, and to identify policy solutions for every level of government to adopt to help improve public health by improving housing affordability, quality, and stability. Mike Bare, Community Advocates Public Policy Institute, Project Lead; Deb Heffner, Community Advocates Public Policy Institute, Housing Strategy Director
71. From Roots to Results: A Qualitative Case Study of the Evolution of a Public Health Leadership Institute Building Capacity in Collaborating for Equity and Justice Focusing on power as a root cause of health and health equity requires changes in contemporary public health practice. The Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute (HWLI) was created to support coalitions to utilize community-driven approaches to improve health. Over the past 12 years, HWLI has shifted from using a more traditional public health core competency-based curriculum to one that supports participants in power-building partnerships with those most impacted by inequities to influence decision-making structures. Presenters will provide both theory and concrete examples of how their work has contributed to building health equity in Wisconsin since 2006. This session intends to elicit discussion of how other communities may begin to implement strategies that are shared to build and advance health equity. Raymond Neal, UW Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, Community Coach; Alan Talaga, UW Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, COACH Program Lead;  Paula Tran Inzeo, UW Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) Group, Director
Session # Session Title Description Presenters
13. Greater Together - Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Milwaukee’s Creative Sector It is well accepted that the economic vitality of cities in the US is sustained by the heartbeat of its creative culture. Unfortunately, we also know that people of color are tragically underrepresented in Milwaukee’s creative occupations. Milwaukee nonprofit Greater Together has announced a challenge to Milwaukee's creative industry to hire at least 1,600 minority employees by 2030. The project, called Greater Equity 2030 will be in part led by Ken Hanson, who founded Greater Together, to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion. To help understand this challenge, Greater Together worked with Dr. Marc Levine and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Center for Economic Development to create the first report on racial inequities in Milwaukee’s creative occupations. This panel will present the results of this research, how this research is informing new initiatives, and the role played by Greater Together in implementing these initiatives. Ken Hanson, Greater Together, Founder 
14. Got Equity? Equal opportunity and inclusive practices are common components of strategic plans. What is often lacking is a focus on equity. The difference is based on the premise of equity vs. equality. Equal opportunity and inclusion statements focus on enhancing equality of opportunity, recruiting minorities and engaging in other non-discriminatory practices. Adopting an equity approach means organizations are working to value the worth of their workforce and customer base. Thus, removing barriers to success and impacting the overall welfare of everyone involved. Diversity and equity efforts are important because they are fundamental to driving quality and excellence on campus. Employees at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College and The Privilege Institute will share examples of how they have created and/or facilitated holistic equity approaches that could be adopted by other organizations. Mohammed I.T. Bey, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Director, Diversity & Inclusion; Vickie Lock, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Dean, Student Success;  Jenni Oliver, The Privilege Institute, Director, Institute Operations and Social Equity Advancement
15. Packer Swagger: We Walk the Walk…Will You? This session will focus on how service providers and businesses work together to help employees with disabilities reach their true potential.  Promotion of soft skills will be addressed as well as practical worksite accommodations, and what it means to truly be an inclusive worksite.  Expect to walk away with a new perspective on how inclusion can work in EVERY business and practical tips/knowledge to create business partnerships that support success of clients. Redebra Peters, ASPIRO, Inc., Career Consultant/Vocational Specialist; Jon Ledvina, Packer Fastener, Business Liaison
32. The Demographics of Wealth Inequality Wealth is a source of household financial stability that buffers against short-term financial shocks; supports long-term financial security; and provides a foundation for intergenerational social mobility. All families desire and deserve the benefits wealth can provide, but a family’s demographic characteristics are strong predictors of its income and wealth. The Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances quantifies wealth disparities and trends along demographic dimensions. It shows the impact of race and ethnicity, educational level, and age on wealth gaps. Taken together, these stark disparities show that household financial stability is not equally attainable by all families. Attendees will gain a clear understanding of and access to documentation of the demographic disparities in wealth accumulation which highlights the populations in greatest need of financial intervention and support. Attendees will also come away from the session with the ability to articulate basic facts and clear arguments about why issues of diversity and inclusion matter for our communities and that support informed policy discussions. Lowell Ricketts, Center for Household Financial Stability, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Lead Analyst
33. Creating Inclusive Communities: Impacting the Triple Bottom Line  At last year’s Toward One Wisconsin conference, a common refrain was, “How do we get the business community more engaged in this work?” Businesses have a unique opportunity to be leaders. When working hand in hand with government and the nonprofit world, businesses can have significant impact towards building vibrant, thriving, and inclusive communities. Panelists will address the value of nontraditional partnerships among business, government and nonprofit organizations and how, collectively, they can help Wisconsin communities become more welcoming and inclusive. We will make the case that businesses should be at the table--and have every reason to do so. Diversity and inclusion work, when done thoughtfully, creatively, and in partnership with communities, can improve the triple bottom line and catalyzes positive change. Join us to hear first-hand some of the best practices, data, and resources shared by various Wisconsin based organizations and community partners to collectively advance diversity and inclusion in our communities. Ritika Singh, Associated Bank, Senior Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion; Molly Hilligoss, Welcoming America, Regional Manager, Midwest; Kathy Drengler, Greenheck Fan Corporation, Vice President of Human Resources 
34. Our Sauk, Naturally Through the guidance of the Future Regions Initiative, the Ho-Chunk Nation, Sauk County, and local chambers collaborated on a regional plan to ensure our assets are open and protected for all. What came from this initiative, including the first annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration, has grown into a unique relationship between local government and a sovereign nation. The culmination of this event included placing the Ho-Chunk flag alongside US and WI flags in the County Board Chambers. One Sauk, Naturally focuses on connecting communities through regional programming, and building formerly adversarial relationships, into a bright and prosperous future for all. Attendees will understand that discrimination takes many forms and that it takes many generations for these scars to heal. One Sauk, Naturally is an opportunity to learn from both the Ho-Chunk Nation and Sauk County, a truly unique opportunity. Peter Vedro, Sauk County Board of Supervisors, Chair;  Kristin WhiteEagle, Ho-Chunk Nation, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislator - District 2, Sauk County Supervisor; Gary Becker, Local Government Institute of Wisconsin, Executive Director
52. School-to-Prison Pipeline “School-to-prison pipeline” is the national trend where students are funneled out of public schools and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems. Learn about the theory of the “school-to-prison pipeline” and discuss the effects it has on students. Hear from an individual who experienced the “school-to-prison pipeline” firsthand and how he overcame adversity to move forward after his incarceration. Hear how this experience impacted this individual’s life and how parents, teachers, and administrators can work with students to avoid the pipeline.  Daniel Webster, St. Norbert College, MB
53. Incorporating Tradition and Culture into Curriculum Menominee Tribe’s Vision Statement states, “We envision the Omaeqnomenewak (People of the Wild Rice) as a strong, healthy and proud nation living in accordance with its culture and beliefs, and possessing the resources necessary to be successful in achieving our goals." Menominee Indian School District (MISD) in partnership with the Menominee Tribal Clinic has created an opportunity for students to build science, health and cultural knowledge in the form of Aquaponics. In 2018, MISD constructed a facility to raise Bluegills, Perch, and Tilapia while growing food to use in the school lunch program and donate to their community. In addition to growing lettuce, the Aquaponics class and Garden Club also grows wild rice and tobacco as a way to incorporate tradition and culture into the curriculum. This session shows a successful model for hands on education that incorporates health, wellness, culture, and science to high school students within a Wisconsin tribal community. The program prepares students for their future beyond the classroom, while sharing how a partnership model of school, a health center, and environmental programs work together to provide an unique education.  Klint Hischke, Menominee Indian School District, Science Teacher; Tiger Dixon, Menominee Indian High School, Student; Ashton Mendoza, Menominee Indian High School, Student
54. Talk with Me – Using Innovative Technology to Help Communities Support Equity in Education by Cultivating Language-Rich Environments with Young Children The research is clear: allocating resources to programs that focus on the early years of life – especially children from under-resourced communities – is the smartest investment that society can make to yield longer-term education, health, and economic returns. A child’s early language environment is one example of those valuable front-end investments. Ensuring that all young children are experiencing high-quality interactions throughout their day – both in the home and classroom settings – is critical to addressing barriers to equity, access, and excellence. Without stimulating adult-child interactions throughout the day, children lack access to optimal social, emotional and cognitive development opportunities. The strategies presented using LENA Grow and LENA Start will illustrate innovative ways in which communities can help lay the groundwork for success in kindergarten and beyond for children, regardless of their background. Renee Nogales, MPA, LENA, Principal, Early Childhood Partnerships; Corina Norrbom, MD, Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service, Health Policy Fellow
72. The Growing Pains of Health Equity in Rural Wisconsin If your organization is new to health equity work, it can be difficult to put the concept into practice and there is often no clear pathway for organizations to take. Starting this work is important and being prepared to address the challenges and barriers of health equity work is key in implementing successful strategies. Come hear how different entities in rural Central Wisconsin found their way forward with health equity, why they believe this work is important, the challenges they faced, and how they got past some of the challenges along the way. Lindsey Eierman, Family Health La Clinica/Central Wisconsin Health Partnership, Community Health Engagement Coordinator; Margo Dieck, Waupaca County Public Health/Central Wisconsin Health Partnership, Community Health Educator;  Brenna Root, Waushara County Health Department/Central Wisconsin Health Partnership, Public Health Education
73. Building Health Equity One Community at a Time….Collaboration between the UW and Appleton This session will highlight a collaboration between the UW Population Health Institute and the City of Appleton to address health equity and will speak to why addressing health inequities matters. Participants will also learn why a Health in All Policies ordinance can benefit all members of the community and the process used to gain support for passage. This presentation will provide an example of how diverse interests within communities can work together with local government to create and support policy at the local level leading to improved community health and inclusion. This information will be most meaningful to policy makers, community and neighborhood associations, and non-profit organizations. Kurt Eggebrecht, City of Appleton, Health Officer; Paula Tran Inzeo, UW Population Health Institute, Mobilizing Action Towards Community Health (MATCH) Director
74. The Role of a Professional Doula: Elevating Standards to Modernize the Ancient Concept The role of a Doula has been present in the realm of birth and parenting since the beginning of time. However, the evolution of Doulas has had a slow progression into the workforce as a professional career path. Currently, the mandates and standards are minimal and the role continues to be viewed as a philosophy versus a profession. By elevating the role and expectations of doulas to a professional level in the eyes of expectant parents, medical professionals, and doulas themselves, provides people of all demographics a regulated and rewarding career opportunity. Nakita Tepolt, Wisconsin Family Doulas, Owner and Doula; Amy Tromp, Wisconsin Family Doulas, Doula; Kristin Lyerly, MD, MPH, FACOG, ACOG District VI Secretary
Session # Session Title Description Presenters
16. Using Apprenticeship Programs to Train Inmates  Wisconsin’s Apprenticeship programming is a staple training method in many industries.  Innovative thinking and meeting employer demands is essential to create the workforce needed.  Department of Workforce Development and Department of Corrections are partnering to provide training in essential occupational and pre-apprenticeship skills for the state’s inmate population.  The session will spotlight innovative efforts and success stories in preparing the incarcerated for entry into the workforce. Becky Kikkert, Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Office of Special Initiatives, Director 
17. Employee Network and Affinity Groups In this session, hear from 3-4 organizations across different industries as they attempt to bridge the Inclusion and Diversity gap is through employee network and affinity groups. The group will share experiences from their varying maturity of their Network and affinity groups including why locally and nationally they are impactful and are becoming highly valued as company mainstays. Attendees will walk away with a clear strategy whether they are starting an Affinity group journey or continuing to build on their groups for the future. Come learn about Affinity groups, the successes of Affinity groups, and lessons learned in starting up Affinity groups. Adam Jackson, Humana, Senior Culture
18. Innovative Services Offered by DWD Division of Employment and Training Office of Veteran Services The Office of Veterans Services provides services design to guide veterans with barriers to employment into civilian employment with a income that provides a family sustainable wage.  Gary M. Meyer, DWD DET, Office of Veterans Services; Al Garcia, DWD DET, Office of Veterans Services, Southern Region Supervisor, Office of Veterans Services; Jessica Maple, DWD DET Office of Veteran Service, Northern Region Supervisor
35.  Breaking Down Barriers Through Storytelling When a tragic incident of teen violence occurred in Wausau, it triggered a series of events that uncovered serious tensions in the community. The Wausau area has become more diverse, but real cultural and ethnic divisions exist, with deep roots that rarely were acknowledged, much less understood. The Toward One Wausau project was started by people who felt the community could do a better job helping all feel welcome and safe. Telling one’s own story and listening to the stories of others has proved to be a powerful way to begin difficult community conversations and pave the way for action. The mission of the Toward One Wausau project is to bring together community members from all walks of life to talk openly, listen earnestly, and act in unity in order to help make Wausau a safe, welcoming and attractive place for everyone.  Corina Norrbom, WIPPS, Health Policy Fellow; Gwen Taylor, Girl Scouts of the Northwestern Great Lakes, Program and Inclusion Director;  Kayley McColley, One Wausau, Board Member
36. The N!gga(er) Word: Is There a Method in Our Madness? Who is allowed to say the N!igga(er) word? What do we do/say when N!gga(er) is said in our classrooms, playgrounds, practice fields, community centers and resident halls? Ignoring the N!gga(er) word is not an option anymore – You can hear N!gga(er) anywhere at anytime in the 21st century. This workshop looks at the history/impact of the N!gga(er). Participants are challenged to examine their personal and professional histories with N!gga(er), examine when and/or how they first heard N!gga(er) and most importantly, to explore what to do when encountered.  Eddie Moore Jr., PhD, The Privilege Institut
55. W.E.U.P.- We Empower, Uplift, and Persevere  Learn how support staff at Lombardi Middle School in Green Bay are incorporating culturally relevant art, music and language to engage and educate students. Kominiko Sila and Stephanie Stevens took their student’s negative interactions at school and engaged them with culturally relevant experiences and opportunities. This session will help show how culturally relevant arts and language can be introduced into the daily interactions of students to make them feel welcome and accepted. Stephanie Stevens, Oneida Nation - Youth Enrichment Services (YES) AdvocatelKominiko Sila, Green Bay Area Public Schools, Student Learning Advocate
56. Rigor, Relevance & Representation -The 3Rs Needed to Create Equity in Education  The session is designed to advance the process of learning that leads to an enhanced ability to effectively respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the presence of cultural diversity in a defined social system. In this highly interactive activity-based workshop, participants will learn strategies to help:  1. Learn about the benefits of demonstrating culturally competent attitudes and behaviors in an educational setting to promote equity. 2. Understand how one’s views, biases, statements, and assumptions impact relationships with others, including co-workers, students, and community stakeholders. 3. Discuss practical methods to work effectively with diverse audiences.     Rayon Brown,  Fox Valley Technical College, Director of Diversity & Inclusion; Mayra Pasayes, Fox Valley Technical College, Scholars for Success Coordinator
75. Black Communication: Supporting Healthy Black Families Our workshop examines the role of culture as a factor in enhancing the effectiveness of health communication. We describe culture, beliefs , values, and root values that are nonverbal and how it may be applied in audience segmentation and a model of health communication planning through an intersectional approach model will be introduced—as a framework for considering the ways in which culture may influence health communication effectiveness. In Black communities and groups across Wisconsin, Supporting Healthy Black Families inside and out is an initiative that utilizes interventions that are community-based, trauma-informed, and culturally responsive. The design of this effort moves marginalized populations from being recipients of services (traditional service providers) to individuals with agency, autonomy, and self-efficacy that support their leadership and advocacy development Jalateefa, Sankofa Educational Leadership United, Founder;  Thedora Hodge, Sistah’s of African Decent, Founder; Isaiha Meyers, Sankofa Educational Leadership United, COO
76. To be announced